Tag Archive for who gets the heart

Drafting Tuesday!

Standard:

  • ELACC9-10WHST4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • ELACC9-10WHST5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

Learning Target: Students will draft their “Who gets the heart” essay.

Daily Video:

Welcome to Tuesday, everyone! Today you’re going to be drafting your first essay! I’ve got a drafting sheet for everyone. There’s a brainstorming section on the front, but since we did the brainstorming yesterday, you don’t need to use that section if you don’t want to. If you DO need any scratch paper, that’s what the brainstorming box is for, so use that space to help you organize, write out words to see if they look like they’re spelled write, jot down ideas for later so you don’t forget, and so on.

You’ll have the whole class period to draft. Remember, tomorrow we are in the lab to type this up, so if you get your writing completely done today, you have a pretty easy day coming your way tomorrow. Good luck today, you’ll  be awesome!

Oh, sidenote – you will have your SLO pretest tomorrow! I know that’s really soon at the beginning of the year, but you gotta take the pre-test before you learn a bunch of stuff or it doesn’t really work, kwim?

Differentiation: Process – students will be given an outline / guided draft sheet if needed (scaffolding); product – shortened essay if needed for some students, additional complications to writing scenario for advanced students.

Assessment: Essays will be a major grade.

Brainstorm Your Monday!

Standard: W.9-10.1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

  • Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence.
  • Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns.
  • Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims.
  • Establish and maintain a formal style and objective tone while attending to the norms and conventions of the discipline in which they are writing.
  • Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented.

Learning Target: Students will get their first essay topic and begin to debate about it.

Daily Video: 

Welcome to Tuesday!! Today we’re going to start our first essay for this semester. I introduced these people to you yesterday, but we will run through it again and then you guys can start the brainstorming process 🙂 go ahead and grab a sheet of paper and we will do a thinking map together on the board to help get some of our ideas down on paper!

Next up, we’ll be doing an outline. I’ll write the outline down on the board for you and you can copy it onto your own paper so you kind of have the format down. Our target word count for the final essay is 500 words.

You’ll turn in your brainstorming and outlining today. Brainstorming is worth 10% of your essay grade; outlining is worth 30% of your final essay grade.

Here’s the info again 🙂

Located at Swedish Hospital in Seattle, Wash., is the famous surgical team for heart transplants. It is the only medical hope of life for the people eligible for immediate transplants.

One problem associated with the transplant is that there are many more people who need it than there are available donors. Doctors examine all those with other diseases for whom this would be only a temporary solution. They turn over their list of recommended patients to the hospital administration. At present, the doctors have submitted the names of five people for one heart from a potential donor.

The committee assembled to make the decision has been given a brief biography of each person appearing on the list. It is assumed that each person has an equal chance of remaining alive if allowed the transplant. Thus, the committee is asked to decide which one of these may have first access to a donor heart.

You are a member of this committee. Remember, there is only one vacancy for a transplant, and you must fill it with one of these five people. The only medical information you have is that each equally needs the transplant. It is up to you.

Directions: Read over the information in the attached Biographical and Psychological reports. Make a decision based upon the information you have. YOU SHOULD HAVE AT LEAST TWO STRONG, CONVINCING REASONS FOR YOUR DECISION AND AT LEAST ONE REASON AGAINST EACH OF THE OTHER CANDIDATES. When you have your information in mind, complete an outline for an essay on this topic.

Heart Transplant Psychological Reports Sheet

In routine preadmission interviews the following patients were examined and evaluated as per the following data:

Alfred:

American male, age 45, married for 21 years. Has two children (boy 18, girl 15). He is a research physicist at the University Medical School, working on a cancer immunization project. Current publications indicate that he is on the verge of a significant medical discovery Alfred is also on the health service staff of the local university member of county medical society member of the Rotary International, and Boy Scout leader for 10 years.

He is currently distraught about his physical condition and reports that it interferes with his work. Seems very committed to his work and appears to be legitimately on the verge of an important cancer discovery. It was hard for the staff to get him to talk about his work in terms they could understand.

Family relations seem strained and have been for some time because of his commitment to his work. The staff feels that he is a first-rate scientist and scholar who has contributed much and could contribute more to medical research. But they also believe him to be a mentally disturbed individual who, in time, will probably need psychiatric help.

Bill:

American male, age 27, married for 5 years. Has one child (girl 3) and wife is six months pregnant. He is currently employed as an auto mechanic in a local car dealership. Bill is attending night school and taking courses in rebuilding automatic transmissions. He is active in his church. Plans to open an auto transmission repair shop upon completion of the trade school course. He is strongly devoted to his family and appears to be an excellent husband and father. Bill made average grades in high school, and he had no record of delinquency and was always regarded by his teachers as a student who tried hard.

His wife is trained as a legal secretary. Her prognosis for employment is good, although Bill has discouraged her from seeking work because he wants her to be a full-time mother. Bill seems unaware of the serious implications of his illness.

Cora:

American female, age 30, married for 11 years. Has five children (boy 10, boy 8, girl 7, girl 5, and girl 4 months). Husband self-employed (owns and operates a tavern and short-order restaurant). She is a high school graduate, but has never been employed. The couple has just purchased a home in the local suburbs and Cora is planning the interior to determine whether she has the talent to return to school for courses in interior decorating. Cora is very devoted to her local animal rescue.

The staff members evaluating Cora noted that her animal rescue is a very large part of her life. She is president of the local ASPCA organization and seems to be able to talk about nothing but her dogs and her children. She has recently developed a passion for interior decorating, but it seems to take a backseat to her rescue activities. Cora seems resigned to her illness and likely death. Her husband works long hours, is in good health, and enjoys the respect and love of his children. Cora’s mother, who also lives with the family, handles most of the childcare.

David:

American male, age 19, single, but recently announced engagement and plans to marry this summer. He is currently a sophomore at a large eastern university majoring in philosophy and literature. He is fluent in Spanish. Eventually he hopes to earn his Ph.D. and become a college professor. David is a member of several campus political organizations; an outspoken critic of the college administration; was once suspended briefly for “agitation;” has had poetry published “in various literature magazines around the New York area. David’s father is self-employed (owns a lawn care business), mother is deceased, and has two younger sisters ages 15 and 11.

Typical student activist, David is a bright, almost straight “A” student who enjoys the respect of most of his teachers and friends. He appears confused about his future, however and demonstrates a penchant for jeopardizing it by involving himself in various student causes. Indeed, his college dean of student affairs regards him as an individual who will “demonstrate for anything.”

David is bitter, almost paranoid, about his illness. His father has invested a good deal of money, time, and emotion in him and has always hoped that David would become a lawyer. His relations with his father are strained, however, and he seems only mildly concerned about his two sisters, although they still think highly of him. His future father-in-law, who is a highly successful businessman, expects him to enter the family enterprise upon college graduation.

Edna:

American female, age 34, single, currently employed as an executive in a large manufacturing company where she has worked since college graduation. Member of local choral society; was alto soloist in Christmas production of Handel’s Messiah. Edna has been very active in several church and charitable groups.

She is a self-contained, inner-directed woman and a model of the “career woman.” It was clear to the staff that her natural aggressiveness and combative tendencies worked against any sort of marital attachment.

Edna’s employers regard her as indispensable. Her work record is superb and her activities in church and charitable groups have been effective. She is well regarded by all who know her, although she seems to have few, if any, close friends.

Differentiation: Process – students will be given guided outline sheets as needed, as well as models for brainstorming using Thinking Maps.

Assessment: Brainstorming will be worth 10% of the essay grade; outline will be worth 30% of the essay grade.

It’s FRIDAY!!! Ready to Think?

Standard: 

  • SL.9-10.3. Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

Learning Target: Students will receive the expectations for their summer reading assignment, and we will do a group “bomb shelter” activity to start the thought process for our first major writing assignment.

Daily Video: 

 

Happy Friday! Is everyone looking forward to the weekend?! I AM!!!! I’m going hiking up at Red Top Mountain, which is always fun 🙂

Your requirement for summer reading is simple: Read the book The Kite Runner and fill out a Google form with a few easy questions. It’s not hard, I promise. And when you’re done reading the book, there’s a movie, which is really good!! So it shouldn’t be too terribly hard for you to do.

The Woman Warrior

Funny in Farsi

Whichever you choose,  you gotta do this:

See? That’s not so bad, is it? And seriously, they’re both GOOD books! I won’t spoil it but I promise it’s a good story.

Next up, we’re going to get into groups of four (your tables) and do an activity designed to make you make some hard decisions.

Bomb Shelter Activity

Goal: Today we are going to see how people relate in difficult situations through a variety of activities.

Directions:

  1. A nuclear missile is headed toward Atlanta. Luckily, you are in the new gym during physical education, and can move into a bomb shelter hidden in the locker rooms under the old gym.
  2. This class is instructed to go to a bomb shelter where it has the capacity to hold the whole class and 8 other people.
  3. 13 people come to the shelter to be let The list is below. You must choose only 8 people to enter the bomb shelter. (That means 8 people will live and 5 will die).
  4. First, individually choose the 8 people would want to stay.
  5. The class is then divided into groups of 5-6 and they are asked to come to a consensus as to who gets to stay.( which means not just seeing who has the highest number of votes but to collectively agree on the person)
  6. You only have 25-30 minutes to come to a consensus as to who
  7. Finally, your group will present your findings to the class.

Here are the people who come to the door. Circle your personal choices:

  1. 19-year-old mother and 8 month old baby (they count for  one spot) 7. 57-year-old historian-expert on all history and languages
2. 20-year-old Husband and father of the above Mother and child. Unemployed 7-11 worker 8. 39-year-old 3rd year medical student who flunked out of Emory
3.  16-year-old movie star 9.  24-year-old body builder who has won competitions
4. 44-year-old Expert plumber, carpenter, mason, welder, mechanic who is disabled from an accident on the job 10.67-year-old. Retired officer now security guard (has a gun- can’t separate gun from person)
5. 33-year-old high  school science  teacher 11. 21-year-old Georgia Tech cheerleader
6.  77-year-old minister 12. 48-year-old nurse- been working on cancer unit for 20 years
13. 31-year-old parolee just got out of jail for growing marijuana

Process questions:

  1. Which people were easy for you to select and please say what you valued about them?
  1. Which people did your group’s decision involved controversy over and why? How was the controversy resolved?
  1. What is the gender of the Tech cheerleader? Why?
  1. What qualities did you decide that certain people had that you chose them?
  1. State one conflict that you had with another member of the group:

Now, please circle your group’s final decision:

  1. 19-year-old mother and 8 month old baby (they count for  one spot) 7. 57-year-old historian-expert on all history and languages
2. 20-year-old Husband and father of the above Mother and child. Unemployed 7-11 worker 8. 39-year-old 3rd year medical student who flunked out of Emory
3.  16-year-old movie star 9.  24-year-old body builder who has won competitions
4. 44-year-old Expert plumber, carpenter, mason, welder, mechanic who is disabled from an accident on the job 10.67-year-old. Retired officer now security guard (has a gun- can’t separate gun from person)
5. 33-year-old high  school science  teacher 11. 21-year-old Georgia Tech cheerleader
6.  77-year-old minister 12. 48-year-old nurse- been working on cancer unit for 20 years
13. 31-year-old parolee just got out of jail for growing marijuana

Reflection Questions:

  1. How are the two lists (your personal list and the final list) different?
  1. Were there any people that you felt strongly about that didn’t get on the final list? How did that feel?
  1. What did you value most in your decisions? Consensus (i.e. working with the group) or you sticking with your own decisions?
  1. How does understanding our own values help us with understanding how we want our life to be lived?
  1. How does understanding others values impact relationships individually and in groups?

 

Ticket out the Door

What did you learn about yourself from this activity based on who you would allow to live and who you would let die?

 

Assessment: Bomb shelter activity graded on completion, ticket out the door taken up

Differentiation: As students finish, an optional enrichment activity is offered/encouraged:

Enrichment Activity

Create your own bomb shelter scenario. You could use another kind of apocalypse like zombies taking over the world, or aliens taking over the surface of the world. Create a list of 13 candidates below.

  1. 7.
2. 8.
3. 9. 
4. 10.
5.   

 

 

lkl

 

11. 

 

6. 12.
13.

 

–OR–

 

Bomb shelters were popular in the fifties and sixties. Many exist today. Research bomb shelters. Find out five things about bomb shelter.

Assessment: Bomb shelter activities will be graded (formative).

Differentiation: Process – students will arrive at conclusions in different ways, students may or may not do the enrichment activities. Content – students will choose their own groups and debate with the peers they are most comfortable with.

 

Surprise!

So, it turns out we got trumped for the lab today because there’s some testing going on. That’s OK!! We will make the best of it!

You guys will have until the end of class to finish writing your drafts by hand. You don’t need to be flawless in terms of grammar, spelling, etc., but it should be easy for me to read, since I need to interpret your handwriting! They are DUE at the end of class today!

But, BONUS! Because we are trapped here and I promised you some time to relax after your essays were done, today we’re going to turn on The Kite Runner while you write in class. This is the movie made from your summer reading book, so since I KNOW you all TOTALLY read the book, this will be a great refresher and you have no excuse to not do the summer reading. Which, by the way, you can complete right here:

Summer Reading 2015 – Sophomores

Enjoy, everyone!

Drafting Wednesday!

Standard:

  • ELACC9-10WHST4 Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.
  • ELACC9-10WHST5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.

Learning Target: Students will draft their “Who gets the heart” essay.

Daily Video:

Welcome to Wednesday, everyone! Today you’re going to be drafting your first essay! I’ve got a drafting sheet for everyone. There’s a brainstorming section on the front, but since we did the brainstorming yesterday, you don’t need to use that section if you don’t want to. If you DO need any scratch paper, that’s what the brainstorming box is for, so use that space to help you organize, write out words to see if they look like they’re spelled write, jot down ideas for later so you don’t forget, and so on.

You’ll have the whole class period to draft. Remember, tomorrow we are in the lab to type this up, so if you get your writing completely done today, you have a pretty easy day coming your way tomorrow. Good luck today, you’ll  be awesome!

Differentiation: Process – students will be given an outline / guided draft sheet if needed (scaffolding); product – shortened essay if needed for some students, additional complications to writing scenario for advanced students.

Assessment: Essays will be a major grade.