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Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 9

Don’t forget! Zoom meeting TOMORROW at 10am! I will send the link in Remind at 9:45!

Goals for the Week:

  1. Finish reading and analysis of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Understand why A Doll’s House is considered feminist, and how it remains relevant today.
  3. Collaborate with your teacher or classmates to discuss the play.

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read and consider this article on Toxic Masculinity from The New York Times
  2. Read and consider this comic on the concept of “Mental Load” (If that link isn’t working, read this article on Mental Load instead)
  3. Read and consider this depressing study on how women are expected to handle all the household work

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: 

I can analyze how an author develops a central idea by reading three articles so that I can consider my own opinions on feminism and toxic masculinity.

Activator: 

So, we’ve talked a lot about feminism over the last week, but today I’m bringing in a new term that you might be unfamiliar with: Toxic Masculinity. Check out this video that explains what it means!

Work Session: 

Today we’re going to be reading some articles on feminism in the modern day! I would like for you to read, consider, and discuss these articles with your family. Ready? Here we go!

Article 1: Read and consider this article on Toxic Masculinity from The New York Times

  • Questions to consider: 
    • Did you know what toxic masculinity was before reading this article?
    • Have you, or a boy you know of, ever been told “boys don’t cry” or “man up”? What message do you think that sends to little kids?
    • What’s the difference in “toxic masculinity” and someone just being traditionally masculine

Article 2: Read and consider this comic on the concept of “Mental Load” (If that link isn’t working, read this article on Mental Load instead)

  • Questions to consider: 
    • Have you ever noticed this disproportionate work balance at home? If you stay with your mom and your dad, which parent would you ask if you needed to know information like when something is scheduled or if there’s snacks in the cabinet?
    • Have you ever felt this work balance on yourself? Are you (or your sisters, or girls you know) expected to know how to get dinner on the table, while boys are just expected to be ready to eat on time?
    • If you haven’t noticed this, why do you think that is? If you have noticed this, do you think it’s OK?

Article 3: Read and consider this depressing study on how women are expected to handle all the household work

  • Questions to consider:
    • How are chores divided in your house? It’s okay if your mom usually handles laundry and your dad usually handles yardwork, but why do you think that is the “norm”?
    • This article talks a little about same-sex couples. How do you think that changes the household work balance?
    • What do you think about roommates? Many of you will go off to college in a couple years and live with roommates for the first time. How do you expect the chores to be divided up? If your parents or older family members have ever had roommates, how did they divide the chores?

After reading and thinking about these questions, I want you to take the discussion to your family or whomever you’re quarantined with. Ask them the questions, show off the articles, and listen to what they have to say! You might find some differing opinions from your own, and that’s okay!

Closing Session: 

Remember, tomorrow we have our Zoom meeting at 10am – I hope you can attend! We’re going to be talking about how feminism in 2020 relates to A Doll’s House. Consider how the play is still relevant today and lessons of feminism we can learn from it. Have some thoughts ready for tomorrow’s Zoom meeting at 10am!!

I’ll send the link to the meeting out tomorrow at 9:45. Remember to get the Zoom client downloaded and ready!

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing tomorrow!

  1. Attend the virtual class meeting on Zoom if you are able.
  2. Find a way to collaborate with your teacher or classmates – comment on the blog, on YouTube, etc.
  3. Send your “I Need Feminism Because” photo to your teacher, and check your feedback from last week’s assignment 🙂

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 8

Goals for the Week:

  1. Finish reading and analysis of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Understand why A Doll’s House is considered feminist, and how it remains relevant today.
  3. Collaborate with your teacher or classmates to discuss the play.

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read the second half of act III of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen (from when Dr. Rank leaves to the end of the play)
  2. Consider Torvald’s reaction to Krogstad’s letters.
    • How did he react after reading the first letter? How did his behavior change after reading the second letter?
  3. Consider Nora’s actions at the end of the play.
    • What did Nora do at the end of the play? What choice did she make? Do you think she made the right decision?

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Learning Target: 

I can analyze a particular cultural experience by reading A Doll’s House so that I can understand why Nora’s actions at the end of the play were radical.

Activator: 

Take a look at this scene from the very end of A Doll’s House. This isn’t the very very end, but it is close to it – listen closely to Nora when she talks about her most important duties in life:

Work Session: 

Today we finish reading Act III of A Doll’s House. We will start when

  • Here is my annotated copy of the text. You can add your own comments on Google Docs!
  • Here is the full text of the play  – use this if Google Docs gives you trouble.
  • Here is the full audiobook, if you would rather listen to it. That link should take you directly to where today’s reading starts 🙂

While you read, consider our checklist questions for the day:

  1. Consider Torvald’s reaction to Krogstad’s letters.
    • How did he react after reading the first letter? How did his behavior change after reading the second letter?
  2. Consider Nora’s actions at the end of the play.
    • What did Nora do at the end of the play? What choice did she make? Do you think she made the right decision?

And that’s it! You’ve read the entire play!!! Congratulations!

Closing Session: 

Every time we read a book, you guys are always all like “Can’t we just watch the mooooovieeeeeeeee????” and usually I say no, we’re reading this, and the movie is awful anyway. But in this case, A Doll’s House is a play, and plays are meant to be watched! So here it is!

You’re not required to watch the whole thing, but let’s face it, we’re all bored out of our skulls at this point, right? Watch whatever parts you need to get a better understanding of the play.

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing tomorrow!

  1. Read and consider this article on Toxic Masculinity from The New York Times
  2. Read and consider this comic on the concept of “Mental Load”
  3. Read and consider this depressing study on how women are expected to handle all the household work

 

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 7

Goals for the Week:

  1. Finish reading and analysis of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Understand why A Doll’s House is considered feminist, and how it remains relevant today.
  3. Collaborate with your teacher or classmates to discuss the play.

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read the first half of act III of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen (from the beginning of the act to when Dr. Rank leaves)
  2. Consider the relationship between Krogstad and Mrs. Linde.
    • How does this relationship differ from Nora and Torvald’s? How does Krogstad act around Mrs. Linde, compared to how he acts around Nora?
  3. Reflect on Nora as a dynamic character vs. Torvald as a static one.
    • Nora has changed and grown (dynamic character) and Torvald has stayed exactly the same (static character). Reflect on how the two of them are interacting now, in act III, versus how they were interacting back in act I.

Today’s Lesson!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: 

I can consider how the complex relationships between characters advance the plot of the play by reading and reflecting on A Doll’s House, so that I can understand Nora’s actions at the end of the play.

Activator: 

Need to remember what happened last week? Want a preview of Act III? You’re in luck! Our activator today is this great audio summary video!

Work Session: 

Today we begin reading Act III of A Doll’s House. We will start at the beginning of the act and read until Dr. Rank leaves (poor guy, he’s dying 🙁 )

While you read, consider our checklist questions for the day:

  1. Consider the relationship between Krogstad and Mrs. Linde.
    • How does this relationship differ from Nora and Torvald’s? How does Krogstad act around Mrs. Linde, compared to how he acts around Nora?
  2. Reflect on Nora as a dynamic character vs. Torvald as a static one.
    • Nora has changed and grown (dynamic character) and Torvald has stayed exactly the same (static character). Reflect on how the two of them are interacting now, in act III, versus how they were interacting back in act I.

As we finish our reading for the day, we’re starting to get to a breaking point with Nora. She’s tried everything she can try to keep Torvald from finding out her secret… and now there’s nothing left but to deal with the fallout. We’ll see how that plays out tomorrow at the end of act III.

Closing Session: 

One of our goals for the week is for you to collaborate with your classmates or teacher. In order to facilitate that, for our closer today I want you to go download the Zoom app and create an account! Head over to Zoom.us or search the App Store or Google Play store. You can start playing around with Zooming your friends or classmates, and

Friday, I will host a Zoom class meeting at 10am. 

  • This meeting is completely optional, but I encourage you to attend and collaborate!
  • You don’t have to come if that time doesn’t work for you. But if you can come, that would be great!
  • We will be discussing feminism in A Doll’s House and really anything else you guys want to talk about 🙂

Once you’ve got Zoom installed and you’re done with the reading, that’s it, you’re done for the day!

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing tomorrow!

  1. Read the second half of act III of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen (from when Dr. Rank leaves to the end of the play)
  2. Consider Torvald’s reaction to Krogstad’s letters.
    • How did he react after reading the first letter? How did his behavior change after reading the second letter?
  3. Consider Nora’s actions at the end of the play.
    • What did Nora do at the end of the play? What choice did she make? Do you think she made the right decision?

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 6

Welcome to week 2!! You did it, you successfully completed your first week of online learning!!!

Goals for the Week:

  1. Finish reading and analysis of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  2. Understand why A Doll’s House is considered feminist, and how it remains relevant today.
  3. Collaborate with your teacher or classmates to discuss the play.

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Watch the round table discussion on A Doll’s House.
    • Comment on YouTube with your input!
  2. Learn about the “I need feminism because…” project
  3. Make your own “I need feminism because” photo

Today’s Lesson!

Standard: ELAGSE9-10SL1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.

Learning Target: I can watch a round table discussion and participate by commenting on the video, so that I can be prepared to collaborate virtually with my classmates and/or teacher.

Activator: 

For our opening session today, I’d like to introduce this week’s assignment with a little story. Several years ago, a group of students walked around on Cambridge University’s campus, in England, holding a whiteboard and asking students to complete the sentence “I need feminism because…”. Responses ranged from “I need feminism because women only make 79 cents on the dollar” to “I need feminism because my granny is AWESOME,” to much more serious topics.

In our World Lit classes, we’ve taken the same challenge – twice! Check out the videos below:

Work Session: 

Check out this round table discussion between the World Literature teachers!

Here are the questions we’re discussing today. After watching the video, it would be awesome if you could comment on it (either on YouTube or here on the blog) and give your opinion on one of these! Remember, our goal this week is for some collaboration, so consider replying to your classmates’ comments! The more discussion, the better!

Round table discussion questions:

  1. A Doll’s House is considered a work of feminist literature. Do you agree or disagree with this and why?
  2. At this point in the play, we’ve seen Nora grow from childish and silly to anxious and fearful. Does Nora’s growth seem realistic? Talk to me about how she’s changed so far (through the end of act II).
  3. Nora and Torvald’s relationship was normal for the time when the play was written. Do you think their dynamic is still “normal” today? Is that a good thing or a bad thing? Talk generally about the power dynamic in relationships.
  4. Krogstad, the antagonist of the play, is the only character to consistently treat Nora like an adult. Why do you think that is, and how do you think this drives the play forward?
  5. In the middle of act II, Dr. Rank confesses that he has been in love with Nora for a long time, and is telling her now because he’s going to die soon. Talk about this confession of love. Does this change things for Nora? Does it put something into perspective for the audience?

Closing Session: 

Now that we’ve discussed feminism in our round table, and you guys have grappled with what it means to be a feminist (your definitions were AWESOME, by the way, so much thought and depth!), we’re going to participate in the We Need Feminism Project.

Here is your assignment for this week: Make a sign that completes the sentence “I need feminism because” and send it to your teacher by Friday, March 27th. I will compile these photos into a new video for us!

Some tips:

  • Make the text on your sign bold and readable. Use markers, crayons, or color really heavy with pen or pencil.
  • You don’t have to show your face in your photo, if you don’t want to – use the sign to cover yourself!
  • Keep it school appropriate 🙂
  • If you mess up, get a new sheet instead of using the back. Sometimes writing on the back shows through the photo.
  • Make sure you flip the photo if you use the selfie cam – you don’t want your text to be backwards!

If you’d like to read more about the original project, you can check out this article, which links to the full gallery. Content warning: The images in the original project are uncensored and adult. Topics include rape, sexual assault, domestic violence, and worse. If you want to look at the originals, you should do it with a trusted adult so that you can talk about what you’re seeing.

https://www.straight.com/blogra/392831/cambridge-needs-feminism-campaign-asks-why-you-need-feminism

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing tomorrow!

  1. Read the first half of act III of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen (from the beginning of the act to when Dr. Rank leaves)
  2. Consider the relationship between Krogstad and Mrs. Linde.
    • How does this relationship differ from Nora and Torvald’s? How does Krogstad act around Mrs. Linde, compared to how he acts around Nora?
  3. Reflect on Nora as a dynamic character vs. Torvald as a static one.
    • Nora has changed and grown (dynamic character) and Torvald has stayed exactly the same (static character). Reflect on how the two of them are interacting now, in act III, versus how they were interacting back in act I.

Online Learning of A Doll’s House, Day 4

Goals for the Week:

  1. Draft a personal working definition of feminism. Due Friday, March 20th
  2. Read and analyze act I of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.
  3. Read and analyze act II of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen.

Today’s Checklist:

  1. Read the first half of act II of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen from the beginning of the act to when Dr. Rank enters, again)
  2. Consider Nora’s conflict with Krogstad.
    • How is Krogstad blackmailing Nora? What does he want Nora to do? Why is Nora playing into it?
  3. Reflect on how Nora is changing.
    • At the beginning of the play, Nora was flighty, ditzy, and childish. Now she’s acting scared, anxious, and she seems to care a lot less about costume parties. What is driving this change?

Today’s Lesson!

Today’s video is a little longer than usual because it’s a 2-for-1 special! Mr. Mellman and Mrs. Bristow collaborate for our literary discussion!

Special guest stars include, Callie, Liam, and Memphis the cat!

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can understand a dynamic female character by reading A Doll’s House and listening to a discussion so that I can analyze how a Nora develops over the course of the play.

Activator: I’ve mentioned before that A Doll’s House is considered the first work of feminist literature. One of the things that makes the play uncommon is that it has a female protagonist, or main character.  For our activator today, I want you to try this exercise:

  • Set a timer for one minute
  • Write down all the stories, books, movies, or TV shows you can think of with a female protagonist – this means the story is ABOUT her, not just she’s in it (so, The Lion King doesn’t count, because it’s not Nala’s story!)
  • How many did you get? Did you run out of ideas before your timer was up?

Now that the wheels are turning and we’re thinking about women in literature, let’s continue reading A Doll’s House and see how Nora is doing in Act II!

Work Session: 

Today you’re going to be reading the first half of Act II of A Doll’s House, beginning at the start of the act and ending when Dr. Rank enters (it’s just a coincidence that we stopped at his entrance during act I – apparently, he tends to enter halfway through the act).

While you’re reading, pay attention to Nora’s relationships with the other characters. Specifically, look at how she interacts with her husband, Torvald Helmer, and her friend, Christine Linde. Remember the questions from the checklist:

  1. Consider Nora’s conflict with Krogstad.
    • How is Krogstad blackmailing Nora? What does he want Nora to do? Why is Nora playing into it?
  2. Reflect on how Nora is changing.
    • At the beginning of the play, Nora was flighty, ditzy, and childish. Now she’s acting scared, anxious, and she seems to care a lot less about costume parties. What is driving this change?

One of the reasons why this play is considered to be feminist is because of how Nora grows over the course of the play. Look back at act I and consider Nora’s attitude and how she acted around her friends and her husband, and look at how she’s acting now at the halfway point in the play. Nora’s growth as a character, from flighty and childish to strong and independent, is a big part of why this is a feminist play. These kinds of characters are rare – think of the list you made in our opening session. Do those characters grow and change over their stories, or do they mostly stay the same?

We don’t have a written assignment today, but don’t forget your personal definitions of feminism are due on Friday! Remember, your definition doesn’t have to be long – just a few sentences or maybe a short paragraph. Use the examples from Monday’s post to guide you 🙂

Closing Session: Take a look at this article, The Problem With Female Protagonists. In it, the author says

We took all his novels out of his bookcase, and sorted them into three piles based on the protagonist’s gender: ensemble (eg. The Wishing Tree), male, and female. And that’s when I discovered something interesting. Despite my concerns that I’d overdone it with the girl characters, and despite my conscious intention to provide a 50/50 split, only 27% of his books have a female protagonist, compared to 65% with a male protagonist.

I want you to try this in your own house! Go to your bookshelf, or movie shelf, or digital library, or whatever, and count up the number of stories that have a female protagonist. Then, divide that number by the total number of stories to get your percentage of female protagonists. Comment here with your number! Did you do better or worse than 25%?

oh, you’re wondering about my shelves? I found 39 out of 218 books and movies had a female protagonist. That’s only about 18%! Yikes! -Bristow

On a book shelf of 540 books, we had about 30 fiction with female protagonists.  It is probably about 450 out of fiction… and I didn’t count any of the ones that I had not read… including a bunch  of the Margaret Atwood… which I assume has a female protagonist, but I am not sure. -Mellman [Ed. note: 30/450 is about 7%]

Looking Ahead: Tomorrow’s Checklist

If you want to get ahead on things, here is what we’re going to be doing tomorrow!

  1. Read the second half of act II of A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen (from when Dr. Rank enters to the end of the act)
  2. Consider Nora’s relationship with Dr. Rank
    • What does Dr. Rank confess to Nora? Why does he tell her this? What is her reaction? Why does she react that way?
  3. Understand what’s going on with the blackmail situation.
    • Krogstad drops a letter in the mailbox. What does it say? What’s with Nora’s freak-out dancing? Why does Nora end the act saying “ Five o’clock. Seven hours until midnight; and then four-and-twenty hours until the next midnight. Then the Tarantella will be over. Twenty-four and seven? Thirty-one hours to live.”?