Tag Archive for troy

World Lit: Troy, Death of Hector comparison

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Georgia
  • ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia
  • ELAGSE11-12RL3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). Georgia
  • ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.) Georgia
  • ELAGSE11-12RL6 Analyze a case in which grasping point of view requires distinguishing what is directly stated in a text from what is really meant (e.g., satire, sarcasm, irony, or understatement). Georgia

Learning Target
Students will analyze the Death of Hector as presented in Troy and The Iliad and compare the two in preparation for an essay.

Opening Session
Let’s recap – tell me about Hector’s death! How did he die in the book? In the movie? In your presentations from yesterday? Why were the versions different?

Work Session
Grab a sheet of paper and let’s make us a Venn diagram! We’re going to compare and contrast the two versions of the Death of Hector we’ve studied in class. However, rather than just listing the differences and similarities, after each one we’re going to examine and discuss WHY it was changed or left the same.

Closing Session
To close out the day, I want everyone to write me an introductory paragraph, including a claim (thesis statement) for the essay you’ll be writing in-class tomorrow.

Assessment
Formative (class discussion)

Differentiation
Process (learning style); Interest (movie vs book)

World Lit: from Book 22, The Death of Hector

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will read and analyze “The Death of Hector” from The Iliad, comparing it to the interpretation they saw in Troy.

Opening Session
Grab your popcorn, because we’re going to open the day by getting to that hour-and-fifty-minute mark! Once we’re there, we will briefly discuss the death of Hector we saw presented in the movie.

Work Session
READING TIME! Grab your copies of The Iliad and read from book 22, The Death of Hector. You can read with your groups or independently if you prefer.

After reading, please answer the comprehension questions at the end of the section.

Closing Session
Close with a “notice and wonder” for today! Write down two things you NOTICED while reading, and two things you’re WONDERING about.

Assessment
Formative (discussions, notice and wonder, comprehension questions)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, annotated text)

World Lit: Troy!

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare). Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze the movie Troy and consider the director and producer’s artistic interpretations of The Iliad.

Opening Session
We’re going to be continuing the movie we started yesterday, with the goal of getting to 1:50 into it. That means we need to get right down to it!!

If it looks like we have time to do it, I wouldn’t mind you guys doing a little anticipatory paragraph. Remembering what you saw yesterday, consider how the directors and producers have chosen to interpret the characters in The Iliad and write for me what you think will happen today.

Work Session
Our entire work session will be watching Troy, which is available on Netflix if you are reading this from home 🙂
Here’s the IMDB on the movie! https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0332452/

Closing Session
Close the day by revisiting your paragraphs from our opening session. Were you surprised at some of the choices the directors made? Why or why not?

Assessment
Formative (paragraphs, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (learning styles); Interest (high-interest movie)