Tag Archive for short story

Cultural Identity: Day 3, “By Any Other Name”

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can analyze how an author presents a cultural identity through a story.

Opening Session
Think-Pair-Share: Look up the meaning and history of your name on BehindTheName.com (use your phone!). Tell your partner about your name, and share any interesting discoveries with the class.

Work Session
We’re going to read a story about names today! Flip in your Springboard to page 43, and let’s read “By Any Other Name” by Santha Rama Rau.

Please read with your table, alternating reading paragraphs aloud around the table. I’ll come around and help, monitor, and maybe jump in and read a little too 🙂 If your group finishes reading early, you can answer the Second Read questions on page 48 to help deepen your understanding of the story.

When everyone is done, let’s discuss this story. How does giving kids a “white” name help destroy their cultural identity?

Closing Session
Write a one-paragraph reflection: How would you have felt in Santha and Premila’s situation? How would you react if a teacher or  administrator took your name away on your first day of school?

Assessment
Formative (Class discussion, reflection paragraph, second read questions)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, vocab list, graphic organizer)

Cultural Identity: Day 2, “Two Kinds”

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can analyze how an author presents a cultural identity through a story.

Opening Session
Amy Tan, the author of the story we’re going to read today, talks about writing from personal experience:

Work Session
Today we’re going to be reading a story in Springboard called “Two Kinds,” by a Chinese-American author named Amy Tan. This story is taken from a larger work called The Joy Luck Club, which is so popular you might have heard of it before!

Flip in your Springboards to page 21, and let’s read together!
After we finish the story, let’s talk about cultural identity. What do you think Jing-mei’s cultural identity is? How would she describe herself? How does her cultural identity differ from that of her mother, and why?

If we have time, we will do the Working From the Text chart on page 32.

Closing Session
Think-Pair-Share! How did Tan develop Jing-mei’s cultural identity through narrative storytelling in “Two Kinds”?

Assessment
Formative (class discussions, think-pair-share, working from the text book check)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, slower reading, vocabulary list)

World Lit: Greek Hero Story DUE!!

Standard: 

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a research-based story about a Greek or Trojan hero.

Opening Session: MLA Format recap!

Work Session: 

YOUR STORY IS DUE TODAY!!!!!

In a well-organized story of about 750 words, depict a scene from the Trojan War starring your chosen character. You should not try to tell me the whole epic story of the ten year war – you can’t do that in 750 words. Instead, you should choose a single scene from the war and show your character in that scene. Your story should include dialogue, sensory language, action, and character development.

Choose one of the following:

  • Greeks:
    • Agamemnon, King of Kings
    • Ajax, Second Best Greek Soldier
    • Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife
    • Diomedes, another awesome Greek soldier
    • Helen
    • Hermione, Menalaus’s and Helen’s daughter
    • Iphigenia, Agamemnon’s daughter
    • Neoptolemus, Achilles’s son
    • Nestor, oldest warlord
    • Philoctedes, slayer of Paris
  • Trojans:
    • Aeneas, Hector’s second cousin and one of the survivors of Troy
    • Andromache, Hector’s wife
    • Cassandra, Priam and Hecuba’s daughter, Hector/Paris’s sister
    • Deiphobus, Hector’s brother (the one Athena pretended to be)
    • Hecuba, Priam’s wife
    • Helen
    • Oenone, Paris’s first wife
    • Polyxena, Hector’s sister who almost married Achilles

Closing Session:

TURN IT IN!!!

AssessmentSummative (stories will be graded)

Differentiation: Interest (choice of character)

World Lit: Greek Hero Story!

Standard: 

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a research-based story about a Greek or Trojan hero.

Opening Session: Share out! Who did you decide to write about and what did you think was particularly cool about that person?

Work Session: 

In a well-organized story of about 750 words, depict a scene from the Trojan War starring your chosen character. You should not try to tell me the whole epic story of the ten year war – you can’t do that in 750 words. Instead, you should choose a single scene from the war and show your character in that scene. Your story should include dialogue, sensory language, action, and character development.

Choose one of the following:

  • Greeks:
    • Agamemnon, King of Kings
    • Ajax, Second Best Greek Soldier
    • Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife
    • Diomedes, another awesome Greek soldier
    • Helen
    • Hermione, Menalaus’s and Helen’s daughter
    • Iphigenia, Agamemnon’s daughter
    • Neoptolemus, Achilles’s son
    • Nestor, oldest warlord
    • Philoctedes, slayer of Paris
  • Trojans:
    • Aeneas, Hector’s second cousin and one of the survivors of Troy
    • Andromache, Hector’s wife
    • Cassandra, Priam and Hecuba’s daughter, Hector/Paris’s sister
    • Deiphobus, Hector’s brother (the one Athena pretended to be)
    • Hecuba, Priam’s wife
    • Helen
    • Oenone, Paris’s first wife
    • Polyxena, Hector’s sister who almost married Achilles

Closing Session:

Trade laptops with a friend and read each others’ stories! Give some constructive feedback on how things could improve.

AssessmentSummative (stories will be graded)

Differentiation: Interest (choice of character)

AP Lit: Battle Royale

Standards

  • RL.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Common Core State Standards English
  • RL.11-12.3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). Common Core State Standards English
  • RL.11-12.7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare and one play by an American dramatist.) Common Core State Standards English
  • RI.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Common Core State Standards English

Objective
Scholars will be able to identify symbols and understand their  meaning in an extended text.

Warm Up
Grammar, Voice, and Independent Reading

Activator
Vocab quiz

New Vocab for the week:

  • metonymy
  • synecdoche
  • hyperbole
  • imagery
  • symbol

Work Session

In groups of 3 read “Battle Royale” from Invisible Man in textbook, p. 285.

In those groups, complete one of the essays (Teacher choice per group): 1, 3, 5, or 8.

Teacher is circulating, helping direct essays.

Closing Session
Discuss some of the answers from the essays.

Assessment Strategies
Thumbs up thumbs down, weather the students are able to understand how the battle royal is a symbol of white society keeping black people fighting each other.