Tag Archive for sesame street

World Lit: Two Kinds, Day 2

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme.

Opening Session: Amy Tan reads her storybook Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat to Elmo and Zoe on Sesame Street!

Work Session: Ok, we’re picking right back up where we left off yesterday with chunks 5 -7 (pg. 26) of “Two Kinds”! When we finish the story, and of course discuss, we will also finish up the Second Read questions on page 30. We will also do the chart on 32…but we’re going to skip the essay, since you just did one on Friday!

Closing Session: Let’s end the day with a book talk! I’ll share what I’m reading, and I’d love to hear from volunteers!

Assessment: Informal check of questions and chart

Differentiation: Product (scaffolded questions)

World Lit:Two Kinds, Continued

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme.

Opening Session: Amy Tan reads her storybook Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat to Elmo and Zoe on Sesame Street!

Work Session: Ok, we’re picking right back up where we left off yesterday with chunks 5 -7 (pg. 26) of “Two Kinds”! When we finish the story, and of course discuss, we will also finish up the Second Read questions on page 30. We will also do the chart on 32…but we’re going to skip the essay, since you just did one on Friday!

Closing Session: Let’s end the day with a book talk! I’ll share what I’m reading, and I’d love to hear from volunteers!

Assessment: Informal check of questions and chart

Differentiation: Product (scaffolded questions)

Smell Like A Monster

Standards

  • RL.9-10.7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).

Opening Session

A classic :)

Learning Target

I will examine the representation of “monsters” in various media such as children’s books, movies, and in The Metamorphosis by writing a short analytical paragraph.

Work Session

Today we’re going to start out by listening to the second half of part I of The Metamorphosis and then talk about monsters in some other media. When we last left Gregor, he had just gotten out of bed and was about to work his way out of his room and try to get to work. Let’s see what happens today…

…Well, that was weird, wasn’t it? Anyway, we’ll of course continue with Gregor later on, but for now how about swapping gears and talking about some other monsters? The video we watched today is a famous children’s story that you’ve all probably read – or if not, you’ve seen it now! But just to reiterate, let’s get six volunteers up here to perform the story! Whoo! Give ‘em a round of applause!

After our lovely acting performs the Wild Things, we’re going to look at a couple of other famous children’s monsters – Grover and Cookie Monster!

So, obviously we have a lot of monsters made for kids today. Wild Things and Muppets are both obviously set up for little children to watch, and obviously not intended to scare. So…what’s up with this? I would like you to think about and discuss this in a paragraph. Yep, a paragraph. Write and turn in one paragraph of 7-10 sentences that answers the following question:

–>Why do you think children’s shows and books choose to use “monstrous” characters such as the monsters on Sesame Street and the Wild Things in Where the Wild Things Are?

Closing Session

Turn in your paragraph and tell me who your favorite monster is :)

Assessment

Students will be graded for their paragraphs as well as for their participation in class discussions and in performing Where the Wild Things Are.

Differentiation

Different learning styles are used in the presentation of different types of monsters. Various reading levels from children’s picture books through college+ level reading of Kafka allow for challenging and accessible texts for all students.

Smell Like a Monster!

Standards

RL.9-10.7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums, including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment (e.g., Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus).
RL.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone).
RL.9-10.9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare).

Activator

A classic :)

Learning Target

Scholars will look at the concept of monsters in children’s literature and television, and they will also read the second half of part I of The Metamorphosis.

Work Session

Today we’re going to start out by listening to the second half of part I of The Metamorphosis and then talk about monsters in some other media. When we last left Gregor, he had just gotten out of bed and was about to work his way out of his room and try to get to work. Let’s see what happens today…

…Well, that was weird, wasn’t it? Anyway, we’ll of course continue with Gregor later on, but for now how about swapping gears and talking about some other monsters? The video we watched today is a famous children’s story that you’ve all probably read – or if not, you’ve seen it now! But just to reiterate, let’s get six volunteers up here to perform the story! Whoo! Give ‘em a round of applause!

After our lovely acting performs the Wild Things, we’re going to look at a couple of other famous children’s monsters – Grover and Cookie Monster!

So, obviously we have a lot of monsters made for kids today. Wild Things and Muppets are both obviously set up for little children to watch, and obviously not intended to scare. So…what’s up with this? I would like you to think about and discuss this in a paragraph. Yep, a paragraph. Write and turn in one paragraph of 7-10 sentences that answers the following question:

–>Why do you think children’s shows and books choose to use “monstrous” characters such as the monsters on Sesame Street and the Wild Things in Where the Wild Things Are?

Closing Session

Turn in your paragraph and tell me who your favorite monster is :)

Assessment

Students will be graded for their paragraphs as well as for their participation in class discussions and in performing Where the Wild Things Are.

Differentiation

Different learning styles are used in the presentation of different types of monsters. Various reading levels from children’s picture books through college+ level reading of Kafka allow for challenging and accessible texts for all students.

Monsters are OUT THERE!

Standards

L.9-10.4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 9—10 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
L.9-10.4.a Use context (e.g., the overall meaning of a sentence, paragraph, or text; a word’s position or function in a sentence) as a clue to the meaning of a word or phrase.
L.9-10.5 Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings.
L.9-10.4.b Identify and correctly use patterns of word changes that indicate different meanings or parts of speech (e.g., analyze, analysis, analytical; advocate, advocacy).
L.9-10.4.d Verify the preliminary determination of the meaning of a word or phrase (e.g., by checking the inferred meaning in context or in a dictionary).
L.9-10.4.c Consult general and specialized reference materials (e.g., dictionaries, glossaries, thesauruses), both print and digital, to find the pronunciation of a word or determine or clarify its precise meaning, its part of speech, or its etymology.
L.9-10.5.b Analyze nuances in the meaning of words with similar denotations.

Activator

It’s MUPPET TIME!

 

Learning Target

Scholars will create their own definition of the word “monster,” examining what it means to be a monster, and look at the poem “Jabberwocky” to determine the meaning of words based on context, in addition to searching for their dictionary definitions.

Work Session

I hope you guys are psyched about our new unit, because I sure am! This is one of my favorite units so far, and I’m really excited to be teaching it to y’all. It’s all about….MONSTERS! I know, I know, I’m awesome, please hold your applause.

Anyway, today I would like to start out by asking YOU all a question! On a little sheet of colored paper, I would like each of you to define the word “Monster” for me. What does it mean? What makes a monster? We will read these definitions together and see if we can come up with some notes about what you guys think it means to be a monster… I’ll post them here!

Afterwards, we’re going to read an article called “What Makes a Monster” by Donald Fergus, in which the author tries to answer that very question. To read this article, we’re going to use the SQUEEPERS method. We’ve done this before, so maybe it’ll be familiar to some of you. But, if not, here’s the drill:

S=survey
-Preview the text
-Look at the pictures/captions
-Read highlighted/ bold words
-Read headings/subheadings
-Think about what you are about to read

Q=question
-Generate questions that we will be able to answer after we read (or look at questions on a test)

P=predict
-Predict 1 to 3 things we will learn while reading

R=read
Read:
-Alone
-With teacher
-With partner
-With a group

R=respond
-Discuss which questions were answered
-Review which questions weren’t answered
-Eliminate questions that aren’t likely to be answered
-Develop new questions
-Continue surveying process

S=summarize
Summarize what we have learned
Sounds relatively easy, right?

Next up, we’re going to read a poem called “Jabberwocky,” the same one that we saw the Muppets perform earlier! This poem is about a monster called the Jabberwock. We will go through each stanza together, and as we do, I would like you to write on your paper (below your article summary) what is going on. When we’re finished, we’ll see if we have a consensus on what Lewis Carroll is saying.

Closing Session

Finally, I would like you all to answer these three questions:

What is the mood or tone of the poem? What are three adjectives Lewis Carroll uses to set the scene?
Why is the Jabberwock dangerous? Why is it impressive that the boy killed the monster? List three words Lewis Carroll uses to tell you these things.
(this is the hard one) Look up all six of the words you used above and write down their definitions as the dictionary gives them to you.
When this is turned in, we’re done for the day! YAY!

Assessment

Graded Ticket Out The Door (Jabberwocky questions)
Monster definition / informal assessment of participation in discussion.

Differentiation

Students can use a variety of technologies to find definitions of the words in Jabberwocky, the article text can be differentiated to appeal to different reading levels, monster definitions are student-generated.