Tag Archive for reading comprehension questions

World Lit: Circle 9, Betrayal

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.) Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will be able to analyze a theme of Dante’s Inferno and write a short essay explaining it.

Opening Session
STORY TIME! As we descend into the final circle of Hell, we get to meet Satan and the 3 worst sinners in all of history. Two of them are from a story we didn’t read this semester called Julius Caesar. So let’s take a few minutes during our Opening Session to talk about the story of Julius Caesar’s betrayal by Brutus and Cassius!

Work Session
And now we delve into the deepest reaches of Hell – Circle 9, Canto XXXIV. We’re going to be reading it together out of the textbook today, closely working through the poetry as Dante surmounts the most difficult obstacle of all, Satan himself.

Now that we’ve finished Dante’s Inferno, I want you to answer the Reading Comprehension questions at the end of the section. This will be graded for accuracy!

Closing Session

VOCAB!! Your quiz will be part of your Dante’s Inferno test, which will be next Tuesday!

  1. Grotesque
  2. Degree
  3. Anguish
  4. Tempest
  5. Perilous
  6. Awe
  7. Writhe
  8. Nimble
  9. Eternal
  10. Haunch

Assessment
Formative (Poster activity), summative (impromptu essay)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding), Product (varied essay length as needed)

World Lit: From Book 1, The Rage of Achilles

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will read the beginning of The Iliad and answer reading comprehension and analysis questions.

Opening Session
Take a few minutes to finish up and turn in the translation activity, because you’ll really need a handle on the language as we go through The Iliad.

Work Session
Next up, let’s read The Rage of Achilles and Hector Returns to Troy. I would like you to answer the reading comprehension questions at the end of the section.

We also need to briefly discuss the concept of in medias res, or, “in the middle of things.”

Closing Session
Let’s close out the day by sharing something we found interesting in the reading today. I know the language is hard, but it’s a pretty cool story – what did you like reading?

Assessment
Formative (questions)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding) Interest (high-interest mythology text)

World Lit: from Book 22, The Death of Hector

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will read and analyze “The Death of Hector” from The Iliad, comparing it to the interpretation they saw in Troy.

Opening Session
Grab your popcorn, because we’re going to open the day by getting to that hour-and-fifty-minute mark! Once we’re there, we will briefly discuss the death of Hector we saw presented in the movie.

Work Session
READING TIME! Grab your copies of The Iliad and read from book 22, The Death of Hector. You can read with your groups or independently if you prefer.

After reading, please answer the comprehension questions at the end of the section.

Closing Session
Close with a “notice and wonder” for today! Write down two things you NOTICED while reading, and two things you’re WONDERING about.

Assessment
Formative (discussions, notice and wonder, comprehension questions)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, annotated text)

World Lit: Sub Day, Act V!

Standard:

Learning Target: I can cite evidence from the text to answer text-dependent questions.

Opening Session: Sub attendance! Whee!

Work Session: Hey y’all! I’m not here today because I’m at a doctor’s appointment for my daughter. Please go ahead and read act V in the text (you can read aloud by tables or silently to yourself if you want) and then answer the following reading check questions:

  1. When Octavius announces that their enemy has come to meet them, how does Antony respond?
  2. Which man is in charge of the army against Brutus and Cassius?  How do you know?
  3. What does Antony mean when he says, “In your bad strokes, Brutus, you give good words?”
  4. How does Cassius describe both Antony and Octavius?
  5. What omens does Cassius report to Messala?  What do you think they symbolize?
  6. How does Brutus view the act of suicide?
  7. What does Brutus say about Cassius at the end of scene iii?  Do you believe Cassius will receive an honorable funeral service?  Why or why not?
  8. How does Brutus die?  Do you believe it is an honorable death?  Why or why not?
  9. Explain the significance of Brutus’ last words:  “Caesar, now be still.  I killed not thee with half so good a will.”
  10. How does Octavius offer to make peace with Brutus’ men?  Do they accept?
  11. Do Antony and Octavius pay respect or disrespect Brutus at the end of the play?  Support your answer with evidence from the play.

Closing Session: You can finish your bubble map from yesterday if you have extra time!

Assessment: Informal – questions will be checked for completion and participation

Differentiation: Process – reading in groups or alone