Tag Archive for reading

AP Lang: Why Arthur Miller Wrote The Crucible

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI3 Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will read and analyze an article about why Arthur Miller wrote The Crucible and then begin reading the play.

Opening Session
VOCAB QUIZ!!!

Work Session
Today we’re going to be reading an article entitled “Why I Wrote the Crucible” by Arthur Miller, the guy who wrote The Crucible. I’m going to give everyone a copy of the article and I want you to practice the SOAPSTone strategy with it.

Speaker
Occassion
Audience
Purpose
Subject
Tone

Write the letters down your paper and examine each one. Then, once you’ve finished SOAPSTone-ing the article, write a short paragraph that answers the question why DID Arthur Miller write The Crucible?

Turn in your SOAPSTone and paragraph when you’re done!

Closing Session
With whatever time we have left, go ahead and begin reading The Crucible. Your HOMEWORK this weekend is to take the book home and finish reading the ENTIRE play by the time you’re back here on Monday!!

Assessment
Formative (vocab quiz, class discussion)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, annotated text)

World Lit: Act I, Scene Thursday

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can understand how Brutus feels conflicted about his role in Caesar’s assassination; I understand how Brutus’s motivations help advance the plot of the play.

Opening Session: A kind of weird but funny Caesar animation, just to get your laughing and activate your brains to reading! http://www.osborne10thlit.com/videos/drama/JuliusCaesartheHighlyCondensedVersion.wmv

Work Session: Today we need to spend most of class reading Julius Caesar. We have to finish act I, which doesn’t sound like a lot, but in reality act I has some of the most crucial parts of the play. As we read, we will pause frequently to discuss, but I want you to always keep these things in mind:

  • Why does Cassius want to kill Caesar?
  • Why does he need Brutus’s help?
  • How do the people feel about Caesar?
  • How does Brutus feel about Caesar – and why does that conflict with his feelings about Rome?

I want to focus in on some very specific lines and talk a bit about rhetoric as well today. In Cassius’s long speech in act I scene ii, he uses several tactics to convince Brutus that Caesar is not only ambitious, but that he’s unfit to rule anyway. After we read that, let’s go back and read it again, but this time, I’m going to get my bell out and ring it every time Cassius uses a rhetorical technique to try and convince Brutus.

Spoiler alert, he actually does win Brutus over to the cause, so I guess you can say it worked out well for him!

We will also read act I scene iii today, which is really there to set the mood more than anything.

Closing session: Ticket out the door: What is your impression of the characters in the play so far? I told you yesterday who the bad guys are, but what about Caesar? Does he sound like a super awesome person? What about Brutus? Does he sound like a good guy or a bad guy? Give me a short paragraph discussing what you think about the characters so far!

Assessment: TOTD can be assessed summatively, participation grades for readers and in-class discussions.

Differentiation: Process, Interest, Readiness (varied length reading parts chosen by students); kinesthetic learning style (a student could ring the bell).

World Lit: Two Kinds, Day 1

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme. (bonus points: find some phrases in that learning target, whew!)

Opening Session: Amy Tan, the author of the story we’re going to read today, on writing from your own personal experience:

Work Session: Today we’re going to be reading a story called “Two Kinds,” an excerpt from The Joy Luck Club, a novel by Amy Tan. As you’ve guessed from the video, Tan is a Chinese-American woman, and her story is largely inspired by her own life.

Our goal today is to get through the first 4 chunks of the story, and then do the Second Read questions 1-4 on page 30. We’re going to go over these and of course frequently stop while we’re reading to talk, so I hope by the end of the day you have a solid handle on the story!

Closing Session: Let’s review our vocab list we got yesterday and make sure everyone was able to find the definitions!

Differentiation: Process (varied length reading passages)

Assessment: Informal – check of Second Read questions

Act I, Scene Thursday!

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can understand how Brutus feels conflicted about his role in Caesar’s assassination; I understand how Brutus’s motivations help advance the plot of the play.

Opening Session: A kind of weird but funny Caesar animation, just to get your laughing and activate your brains to reading!

Work Session: Today we need to spend most of class reading Julius Caesar. We have to finish act I, which doesn’t sound like a lot, but in reality act I has some of the most crucial parts of the play. As we read, we will pause frequently to discuss, but I want you to always keep these things in mind:

  • Why does Cassius want to kill Caesar?
  • Why does he need Brutus’s help?
  • How do the people feel about Caesar?
  • How does Brutus feel about Caesar – and why does that conflict with his feelings about Rome?

I want to focus in on some very specific lines and talk a bit about rhetoric as well today. In Cassius’s long speech in act I scene ii, he uses several tactics to convince Brutus that Caesar is not only ambitious, but that he’s unfit to rule anyway. After we read that, let’s go back and read it again, but this time, I’m going to get my bell out and ring it every time Cassius uses a rhetorical technique to try and convince Brutus.

Spoiler alert, he actually does win Brutus over to the cause, so I guess you can say it worked out well for him!

We will also read act I scene iii today, which is really there to set the mood more than anything.

Closing session: Ticket out the door: What is your impression of the characters in the play so far? I told you yesterday who the bad guys are, but what about Caesar? Does he sound like a super awesome person? What about Brutus? Does he sound like a good guy or a bad guy? Give me a short paragraph discussing what you think about the characters so far!

Assessment: TOTD can be assessed summatively, participation grades for readers and in-class discussions.

Differentiation: Process, Interest, Readiness (varied length reading parts chosen by students); kinesthetic learning style (a student could ring the bell).

♫♪Beasts of England, Beasts of Osborne…♫♪

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Learning Target: I will read chapters 3-4 of Animal Farm aloud and reflect on the changes that have taken place at the farm.

Opening Session: Crash Course World History: Capitalism and Socialism

Work Session: Not much to say today :) We get an awesome video by John Green, then we’re diving back into Animal Farm! We’re going to finish reading chapters 2 and 3 today listening to the audio, then read 4 aloud (I will take volunteers to read today). If you’re following along from home (or ISS), check the post below this one for links to the story and the audiobook.

Closing Session: After we finish our reading today, I want you guys to take a moment to write a short reflection on what has happened so far in the book. Write a short paragraph for me that talks about these changes. What do you think went wrong on Animal Farm? Why did things change when they started out so well? What do you think will happen in the future?

Assessment: Reflections will be graded for completion as a formative assessment; students will discuss important points of the story as they occur.

Differentiation: Process: Audiobook for low readers, independent reading for high readers; Product: illustration option of reflection to visual learners.