Tag Archive for poetry

Love Poems <3<3

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.) Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can analyze Soneto XVII by Pablo Neruda by considering the translations of the poem so that I can write my own love poem.

Opening Session
Reading quiz! This quiz is over the reading you did yesterday, from page 103-127.

Work Session
my hero’s journey map and story worksheet (work on coloring map, boxes 4-6)
Consider “Soneto XVII” by Pablo Neruda in English and Spanish:

(Robin Williams reads the poem in English, from Patch Adams)

(The poem read in its original Spanish)
https://redpoppy.net/poem37.php (Both languages side by side)

After reading and analyzing Soneto XVII, use it as inspiration to write your own love sonnet. I’ll write the rhyme scheme for a sonnet on the board!

Closing Session
Continue your reading of The Alchemist to the end of page 153.

NEW VOCAB!!

  1. Abraded
  2. Prognostications
  3. Condemn
  4. Treasonous
  5. Luminous
  6. Hookah
  7. Elixir
  8. Sentinel
  9. Habituated
  10. Stimulus

Assessment
Formative (reading quiz, discussion of Soneto XVII, poems)

Differentiation
scaffolding, graphic organizers, language differentiation (poetry in Spanish)

AP Lit: The Man With Enormous Wings

Standards

  • CCR.R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Common Core State Standards Common Core English/Language Arts
  • CCR.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Common Core State Standards Common Core English/Language Arts
  • CCR.R.3 Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. Common Core State Standards Common Core English/Language Arts
  • CCR.R.4 Interpret words and phrases as they are used in a text, including determining technical, connotative, and figurative meanings, and analyze how specific word choices shape meaning or tone. Common Core State Standards Common Core  English/Language Arts
  • CCR.R.5 Analyze the structure of texts, including how specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions of the text (e.g., a section, chapter, scene, or stanza) relate to each other and the whole. Common Core State Standards Common Core English/Language Arts
  • CCR.R.9 Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. Common Core State Standards Common Core English/Language Arts

Learning Objective
Students will be able to analyze a short text and criticize it.

Activator
voice lesson
Read together :The Red Wheelbarrow by William Carlos Williams, analyzing for imagery. (Define)

Learning session

1. Read the short story : A very old Man with enormous wings by Marquez on p. 325. Chunk into 4 parts (see mellman’s copy)
2. Answer questions 1, 4, and parts of 5 (on page 329), using the picture landscape with the fall of icarus”. Do questions together and discuss.

Closing

Homework
Finish questions if not done in class

Accomodations
Extended time if necessary.

American Lit: Working Toward the Dream

Standard: ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Learning Target: I can analyze multiple texts to identify the development of a recurring idea or theme.

Opening Session: Dolly Parton – 9 to 5

Work Session: Today we’re going to be talking about working towards the American Dream. We will be reading two pieces – a poem, “Who Burns for the Perfection of Paper” by Martin Espada, and an essay, “Roberto Acuna Talks about Farm Workers” by Studs Terkel. After we read and discuss, we will compare and contrast the two pieces, and then do the Second Read questions and chart on page 88 and 92.

Closing Session: 

Do the “Check your Understanding” Venn Diagram on page 92 in the book. Consider the ideas and tones of each piece we read today, and then compare and contrast them in a venn diagram 🙂

Assessment: 

Formative (Class discussions)

Differentiation:

Process (scaffolding, varied text length)

AP Lang: Literary Devices in “I Hear America Singing” and “I, Too”

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Georgia
  • ELAGSE11-12RL7 Analyze multiple interpretations of a story, drama, or poem (e.g., recorded or live production of a play or recorded novel or poetry), evaluating how each version interprets the source text. (Include at least one play by Shakespeare as well as one play by an American dramatist.) Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.) Georgia ELA

Objective
Students will look for literary devices in two poems and analyze why the authors chose to use them.

Opening Session
I have a handout for everyone with a whole bunch of literary devices on them. Take about five minutes, choose 3 literary devices from the list, and come up with an example of each. Then we’ll go around the room and everyone will share one of the examples they came up with. If all yours get taken, come up with another before we get to you!

Work Session
Today we’re reading two poems, “I Hear America Singing” https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/i-hear-america-singing by Walt Whitman and “I, Too” https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poem/i-too by Langston Hughes.

First, I want to look at literary devices in these. Find as many as you can and we’ll share them as a class. More important than finding the devices, consider WHY you think Whitman and Hughes chose to use them.

After we read each poem, I want to discuss who each author was. If you’re reading from home, check out these articles:
Whitman: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/walt-whitman
Hughes: https://www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/langston-hughes

I want to take a few minutes to discuss these two authors and their wildly different perspectives. Why does each author have his specific point of view?

Closing Session
To close the week, let’s relate these two poems and their authors back to the American Dream. We’ll have a short discussion about how each poem relates to this idea of whether or not the American Dream is alive and achievable, and then I’d like everyone to write a short paragraph summarizing your point of view.

Assessment
Formative (discussions, paragraphs)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning style)

World Lit: Welcome to Cultural Perspectives!

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.) 

Learning Target: I can analyze poetry to identify sensory language, structure, and technique. 

Opening Session: VOCAB QUIZ!!!

Work Session: Welcome back to SPRINGBOARD!!! Grab yo books and let’s talk about CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES!!! Go ahead and open to page 112, where we will briefly preview the unit and unpack the first embedded assessment you’ll be doing  

Next up, on page 113, you’ll see a poem called “Where I’m From” by George Ella Lyon. As we always do with poetry, we will read this through three times to really get a feel for it. Then, I would like for you to do the chart under question 3, “Working from the Text”. This chart will ask you to examine the sensory language Lyon uses in her poem. When you’ve finished the chart, start considering sensory details like this that relate to your own life.  We will also turn to page 154, and read 2 additional poems as inspiration. These are called “Woman With Kite” by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni and “Grape Sherbet” by Rita Dove.

After the chart is done, I want you to take Lyon’s, Divakaruni’s, and Dove’s poems as inspiration and write your own. I will write one alongside you, of course. You can use Lyon’s structure as closely or as loosely as you like, but make sure you include sensory details for all five senses in your poem. 

Closing Session: Share out! 

 

Assessment: Informal – book check, formal – vocab quiz 

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)