Tag Archive for drafting

Social Issue Drafting, Day 2!

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.b Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.c Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.e Establish and maintain an appropriate style and objective tone. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.f Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will draft an essay about a social issue that affects their culture or community.

Opening Session
Let’s review how to set up your essay in MLA format and how to do sources in Microsoft Word.

Work Session
You will have the entire class period to draft your essay! Here are the requirements:

  • 750-1000 words
  • MLA format, including parenthetical citations and a Works Cited page
  • Citations from AT LEAST 2 sources
  • AT LEAST 4 quotes total (but more is better!)
  • You must explain a social issue to me AND explain how that issue affects your culture. You do NOT need to go into detail explaining your culture – you did that on the last essay!
  • You should also explain how your social issue can affect at least one other culture besides your own.
  • Your essay should be well-organized and include an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Closing Session
About ten minutes before the end of class, trade laptops with a buddy and review what your friend wrote. Give your partner some constructive feedback on their essay!

Assessment
Summative (social issue essay)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, outlining, graphic organizers), Interest (topic choice)

Social Issue Essay Drafting

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings), graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.b Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.c Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and concepts. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.e Establish and maintain an appropriate style and objective tone. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W2.f Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the significance of the topic). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will draft an essay about a social issue that affects their culture or community.

Opening Session
Let’s review how to set up your essay in MLA format and how to do sources in Microsoft Word.

Work Session
You will have the entire class period to draft your essay! Here are the requirements:

  • 750-1000 words
  • MLA format, including parenthetical citations and a Works Cited page
  • Citations from AT LEAST 2 sources
  • AT LEAST 4 quotes total (but more is better!)
  • You must explain a social issue to me AND explain how that issue affects your culture. You do NOT need to go into detail explaining your culture – you did that on the last essay!
  • You should also explain how your social issue can affect at least one other culture besides your own.
  • Your essay should be well-organized and include an introduction, body, and conclusion.

Closing Session
About ten minutes before the end of class, trade laptops with a buddy and review what your friend wrote. Give your partner some constructive feedback on their essay!

Assessment
Summative (social issue essay)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, outlining, graphic organizers), Interest (topic choice)

World Lit: Things Fall Apart Essay, Day 1

Welcome back! Let’s write an essay!

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Learning Target: I can write a literary analysis of Things Fall Apart.

Opening Session: Crash Course Literature: Things Fall Apart, Part II:

Work Session: Today we are going to start working on our first writing assignment for this unit, a literary analysis! You have two choices for the prompt:

  1. Your assignment is to write an analytical essay about Things Fall Apart in which you examine a character Okonkwo’s response to the cultural collision caused by the introduction of Western ideas into Ibo culture. In your essay, analyze how the collision challenges Okonkwo’s sense of identity, and explain how his response shapes the meaning of the work as a whole.

So, in other words:

    • Choose a character
    • Write about how they reacted to the Europeans showing up and destroying their culture
    • Specifically focus on how the character’s sense of identity was affected
    • Relate the character’s reactions to the meaning of the work as a whole.

–OR–

  1. Your assignment is to write an analytical essay about Things Fall Apart in which you examine how Chinua Achebe reveals a specific theme over the course of the work. In your essay, analyze how the author initially reveals the theme and explain how this theme is developed over the course of the book, and explain how this theme shapes the meaning of the work as a whole.

So, in other words:

  • Choose a theme.
  • Write about how Achebe shows that theme in Things Fall Apart.
  • Explain how that theme is developed or refined over the course of the novel.
  • Relate that theme to the meaning of the work as a whole.
  • ***As a reminder, a theme is a WHOLE SENTENCE. Do not say the theme is “tradition.” Instead, say a theme is “tradition will always conflict with progress.”

Today you’ll be prewriting. In your Springboard book on page 279 you will find a long list of prewriting questions. I would like for you (on your own paper) to address each thing on this prewriting checklist, and check it off as you complete each question/task.

Tomorrow we begin the essay!

Closing Session: Share out! Which character or theme are you writing about?

Assessment: Informal (prewriting check)

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolding)

World Lit: Writing About Cultural Identity, Day 1

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can write a reflective essay explaining my cultural identity.

Opening Session
Grab a laptop and make sure you get the one you’re assigned! Then jump into Word and I will quickly review MLA format with you.

Work Session
Today you’re going to be starting your first embedded assessment! This assessment will be writing a cultural identity essay about yourself. Let’s go over the prewriting, drafting, and editing steps in the book; then let’s double check the rubric on page 58 to make sure we’re all aware of what I’m asking.

Once we’ve done that, I’m going to give you the rest of class to compose your personal essay. I’ve got lined paper if you need it (there’s not enough room in the textbook to write this one, sorry!) and we will be typing them up, revising, and editing tomorrow!

If you don’t finish a draft in class today, you will need to do so for homework, so work hard!

Closing Session
Trade computers with a friend and read their essay. Look for any confusing language, typos, or grammatical errors. Highlight those so they can be fixed tomorrow!

Assessment
Summative (essay)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding) Product (varied essay length)

World Lit: Writing a Literary Analysis Essay, Day 2

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Learning Target: I can develop an argument about a theme in Julius Caesar.

Opening Session: MLA Format!

Work Session: Let’s get started drafting your essay! I’m going to give you some timers on the board to day to get a good draft of your essay going. So pull out the sheet you worked on yesterday and some notebook paper, and let’s get to writing!

  • 10 minutes: Write your introduction paragraph. Remember, your intro paragraph should end with your thesis statement.
  •  20 minutes: Write your body paragraphs. Remember, your body paragraphs should all ultimately further your argument, incorporate evidence (quotes) from the text, and refer back to your thesis statement.
  • 10 minutes: Write your counterargument paragraph. This is where you acknowledge the other side and then explain why it is wrong.
  • 10 minutes: Write your conclusion paragraph. You should refer back to your thesis statement and summarize your argument.

Closing Session: Trade with a partner and read their argument. Spend a few minutes writing commentary or feedback on their draft. Do you understand their point? Do they convince you?

Assessment: Formal (essay)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)