Tag Archive for cultural conversations

Cultural Identity: Day 1

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can understand what cultural identity is and begin to explore my own.

Opening Session
Grab a Springboard book! We’re going to do the culture circle map, activity 1.2 in your book.

Work Session
Your teacher is going to pull up several images on the board. For each image, explain your first associations and impressions invoked by this image. You can fill in the chart on page 6 of your book.

Images:

  • Snapchat logo
  • American flag
  • Pride flag
  • Osborne Cardinal
  • Disney logo

Each of these symbols gives you a different impression, and depending on your personal cultural identity, you might have different ideas than your classmates or teachers do.

Cultural identity can affect how we view the world. With that in mind, let’s read an article that tries to define cultural identity.

  • Read aloud and discuss “What is Cultural Identity”, Springboard pg. 9

With this article in mind, as well as the circle map we did earlier, let’s create a class definition of cultural identity. I’ll write it on the board.
Cultural Identity is…

Closing Session
Ticket out the door! Complete this sentence on a sticky note and stick it to the door on the way out.
My cultural identity is…

Assessment
Formative (TOTD, class discussion, class reading)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, graphic organizers) Learning style (visual/images)

World Lit: Caning Debate

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI5 Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will consider both sides of an issue and debate with their classmates.

Opening Session
Check out this ancient news coverage from CNN in 1994! We’re going to be reading and debating about this case today.

Work Session
Grab your Springboards!!

Today we’re going to be learning about a case from 1994 about a teenager named Michael Fay. Michael Fay was an American teenager in Singapore and committed some nonviolent crimes and as punishment, in accordance with Singaporean law, he was sentenced to be struck with a rattan cane. His dad, who was still in America, went to the media with the case, and a huge debate about the appropriateness of caning as a punishment broke out across the country.

Today we have two articles on this issue, one on the “for” side and one on the “against” side. I’m going to split the class in half. Half of you will read one article, the other half will read the other. Once we have all had a chance to read, I want to have a little debate. We will have a class discussion on caning as a punishment and whether or not we think it was fair or appropriate.

Closing Session
To close out, go to your book and do Second Read questions 1-4.

Assessment
Formative (book check, class debate)

Differentiation
Process (learning style, jigsaw discussion, debate)

World Lit: Childhood Hunger

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI5 Analyze in detail how an author’s ideas or claims are developed and refined by particular sentences, paragraphs, or larger portions of a text (e.g., a section or chapter). Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will understand the issue of childhood hunger and consider ways to address this crisis.
Opening Session
Check out this animated video from No Kid Hungry that summarizes the issue of childhood hunger in America:

Work Session
SPRINGBOARD BOOKS!!!

Grab your Springboards and flip to page 194. We’re going to be reading about some social issues over the next couple days because within a couple weeks you guys will be turning in the second part of your sophomore capstone, the Social Issue essay.

As a reminder, this essay is the one that you will write about a specific social issue that affects your culture (which you wrote about in the last capstone essay, the Cultural Identity essay). You’ll research the issue, explain what it is, and then explain how it affects your culture. For example, if your cultural identity essay was about being an African American girl, you might write about the epidemic of low birth weight babies among black mothers in America. If you wrote about being a gamer, you might write about sexism in the gaming world. If you wrote about otaku culture, you might write about gatekeeping and elitism in the otaku community.

Anyway, today we are going to be completing activity 2.15 in Springboard. We will be reading a UN proclamation and an article about childhood hunger, then answering the Second Read questions and discussing childhood hunger, the worldwide statistics, and how we can work towards solving the problem together.

Closing Session
Think-Pair-Share: Talk to your partner and brainstorm for a few minutes about something you could do to address the issue of childhood hunger. Let’s share some ideas with the class!

Assessment
Formative (book check of Second Read questions)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolded questions)

World Lit: Author’s Stylebook: Description

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

Learning Target: I can identify and evaluate the author’s use of sensory details and figurative language.

Opening Session: I want to read a personal narrative I wrote when I was in college

Work Session: Flip in your Springboards to page 138 and look at the story “If You Are What You Eat, Then What Am I?”. Today we will be reading this short essay and considering sensory details in our own writing, so you can also get out the childhood narrative we’ve been working on for the past couple days

I’ll take a volunteer to read the essay aloud (just one, it’s short) and then I want you guys to do the sensory detail chart on page 140. We will go over it together. Next, I want you to take about fifteen minutes with your childhood narrative and add in some of these sensory details. Consider smells, textures, and figurative language to make your writing come alive, such as the description of tuna as “pink and shiny, like an internal organ.” Consider adding to your narrative to make it connect to a larger story, like how the author uses tuna to demonstrate how little both he and his mother understand about the world.

Finally, I want you to make your own sensory detail chart, and fill it out for your own story.

Closing Session: Anyone got a sensory detail they’re particularly proud of? Share out!

Assessment: Informal (book check)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)