Tag Archive for creative writing

Wakanda Forever!

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL9 Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work (e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will research a pre-colonial African culture and imagine how that culture would look today without the influence of imperialism.

Opening Session
Take ten minutes to polish and turn in your picture books while I go over our project! We’re going to be researching a precolonial African culture while you guys watch Black Panther.

Work Session

This unit we have been reading Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe, and we are watching Black Panther. Each of these works focuses on an African culture, the Ibo culture of Umuofia (modern-day Nigeria) and the fictional Wakandan culture. In Things Fall Apart, the Ibo culture falls apart when western Imperialism comes to Umuofia and the Europeans destroy or change a lot of sacred things. In Black Panther, Wakanda is a nation which was never influenced by Imperialism, and has become a modern nation without losing its original culture. Your task is to envision an African culture as it would be today if it had never been influenced by Imperialism.

  • Choose and research an African culture (Ibo/Igbo, Ibibo, Yoruba, Basotho, Ndebele, Zulu, Maasai, Mursi, etc.)
  • Imagine how that culture would look today if it had never been influenced by Imperialism
  • Complete this packet. This will be an essay grade for this unit!
  • Due: Friday, March 6th, 2020 at the end of your block.

Closing Session
Check in! For a quick ticket out the door, tell me something you noticed about the Wakandan culture that you thought was cool!

Assessment
Summative (writing project)

Differentiation
Scaffolding, varied lengths, learning styles, student choice

American Lit: Write a Myth, Day 2

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.a Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.c Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution). Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.d Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.e Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will compose a creation myth of their own imagining, writing an engaging narrative in the style we have studied in class.

Opening Session
Crash Course Mythology: Creation Stories 2

Work Session
Today we are finishing our creation myths!

  • -Look over the feedback from yesterday
  • -Write another draft of the myth, continuing to work in dialogue. Create your own “voice” and style in the story!
  • -Trade with a different friend for feedback and revise one last time before we turn them in!

Closing Session
Upload your myth to the class Google Drive (or print it out)

Assessment
Summative – myth writing

Differentiation
Scaffolding, flexible grouping, learning styles, content

American Lit: Write a Myth, Day 1

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.a Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation and its significance, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.b Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.c Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole and build toward a particular tone and outcome (e.g., a sense of mystery, suspense, growth, or resolution). Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.d Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE11-12W3.e Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will compose a creation myth of their own imagining, writing an engaging narrative in the style we have studied in class.

Opening Session
Crash Course Mythology: Creation Stories 1

Work Session

We are writing our own creation myths today!

  • -10ish minutes to brainstorm for your myth (Where? When? How?)
  • -30 minutes to draft a myth: 2 paragraphs minimum, must include dialogue in addition to the two paragraphs.

Closing Session
Trade papers with a friend and write feedback on their myth! Does it sound like a myth? How could they strengthen it?

Assessment
Summative – myth writing

Differentiation
Scaffolding, learning style, flexible grouping (intentional pairings for closing session)

World Lit: Greek Hero Story!

Welcome to your next writing assignment! We will be working on this story between now and Thursday, with a brief interruption somewhere in there for Career Cruising 🙂

Standard: 

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a research-based story about a Greek or Trojan hero.

Opening Session: VOCAB!

  1. Anguish
  2. Bravado
  3. Dauntless
  4. Folly
  5. Illustrious
  6. Rabble
  7. Succor
  8. Vex
  9. Vindictive
  10. Quell

Work Session: 

We’re going to start a new essay today! This one should be pretty fun, I hope. I want you to grab a laptop and do some research one a character from the Trojan War, then write me a story about that character’s adventures during the war. I’ve listed several for you to choose from. Although your story should be fictional, you should base on research about that character – for example, Cassandra has prophetic visions that no one believes are true (but in fact they are 100% accurate). If you write about Cassandra, you should include her gift of prophesy and her curse that no one believes her.

Choose one of the following:

  • Greeks:
    • Agamemnon, King of Kings
    • Ajax, Second Best Greek Soldier
    • Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife
    • Diomedes, another awesome Greek soldier
    • Helen
    • Hermione, Menalaus’s and Helen’s daughter
    • Iphigenia, Agamemnon’s daughter
    • Neoptolemus, Achilles’s son
    • Nestor, oldest warlord
    • Philoctedes, slayer of Paris
  • Trojans:
    • Aeneas, Hector’s second cousin and one of the survivors of Troy
    • Andromache, Hector’s wife
    • Cassandra, Priam and Hecuba’s daughter, Hector/Paris’s sister
    • Deiphobus, Hector’s brother (the one Athena pretended to be)
    • Hecuba, Priam’s wife
    • Helen
    • Oenone, Paris’s first wife
    • Polyxena, Hector’s sister who almost married Achilles

In a well-organized story of about 750 words, depict a scene from the Trojan War starring your chosen character. You should not try to tell me the whole epic story of the ten year war – you can’t do that in 750 words. Instead, you should choose a single scene from the war and show your character in that scene. Your story should include dialogue, sensory language, action, and character development.

Closing Session:

Trade laptops with a friend and read each others’ stories! Give some constructive feedback on how things could improve.

AssessmentSummative (stories will be graded)

Differentiation: Interest (choice of character)

World Lit: Circle 5, Wrath

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will understand circle 5 of Dante’s Inferno and how the punishment fits the law of symbolic retribution.

Activator
Journal: Would you say that revenge is a sin? Would you take revenge if someone killed your mother?

Work Session
Synthesis: Write a short story of a page describing a character who is either wrathful or sullen. Continue the poster activity. If necessary, complete any make up work you need to catch up.

Closing Session
Ticket out the door – choose your poster activity for the day and complete it, then hang it on the board.

Assessment
Formative (TOTD, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (guided notes); Product (choice of poster activity)