Tag Archive for argument

American Lit: The Road to Success, continued

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Learning Target: I can critique two arguments, and defend, challenge, or qualify statements in an argument to help me revise my working definition of the American Dream.

Opening Session: Reviewing the powerful speech we read yesterday:

Work Session: Today we’re continuing to read the Road to Success activity in your text. Flip to page 97, “The Right To Fail,” and let’s read it together as a class!

After reading, I want you guys to do the Structured Academic Controversy on page 100 in your book.

The topic is the same as the one you will work on for your essay next week, “Does American Still Provide Access to the American Dream”. We will split into two groups and each side needs to defend their position – side A, “No, the American Dream no longer exists,” or side B, “Yes, the American Dream is still a reality.”

Closing Session:When we finish debating, you can go ahead and start a little drafting or pre-writing for your essay. Tomorrow we will be reading an example of an essay on the same topic from your textbook.

Assessment: Formal – “conversations” will be graded

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding, volunteer readers)

AP Lang: Argument Essay Research

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented indifferent media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can research my chosen topic for my argumentative essay.

Opening Session
Time to choose your topics! I’ll come around and write down what everyone wants to use for their essay topic, and if you’re not sure, I’ll help you pick something.

Work Session
Grab a laptop and start researching your argumentative essay!!

Your goal today is to find three sources online that you can use in your paper and start writing down quotes you can cite in your essay. You should also go ahead and make the Works Cited page while you are doing your research – you can either enter sources in Word (I’ll show you how) or use CitationMachine.net if you are writing in Google Docs.

Your final essay should be at least 750 words and contain at least 3 citations from at least 3 sources. You should avoid any logical fallacies in your argument and use multiple persuasive appeals.

Closing Session
Check in!! I’ll come around and make sure everyone is on track.

Assessment
Formative (essay check in), Summative (essay)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, research help), product (varied length)

AP Lang: Let’s Get Ready To Debate!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12SL4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12SL3 Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, assessing the stance, premises, links among ideas, word choice, points of emphasis, and tone used. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will research and draft arguments to debate on a controversial topic, with a focus on using valid, logical reasoning and avoiding logical fallacies.

Opening Session
Review! Let’s go over the fallacies and persuasive appeals again. And let me ask a question: Which do you think would be most useful in a debate? Because we’re going to be having debates this week!

Work Session
I’m going to pass around a sign up sheet for our debates this week! Here’s the deal:

You will choose either PRO (in favor of) or CON (against) side for your debate topic. You CAN have ONE PARTNER, but you do not have to – and you definitely can’t have more than one partner.

If you choose to have a partner in your debate, you must both speak EQUALLY – no one is allowed to be silent during the debate.

We will be having our debates in class over the next three days. You’ll have the rest of this class period to research your topic and form your argument. Here’s how the debate will be structured:

  • Coin flip to see if pro or con goes first
  • Approximately one minute “opening statement” from each side (about a page of writing)
  • Whoever went first gets to respond to the other side’s points, and then vice versa.
  • Approximately one minute closing statement from each side (about a page of writing – For partners, if you gave the opening statement, your partner must give the closing statement).

You should write out your intro and closing statements, as well as a page-ish of points you think the opposition will make and how you can respond to them.

You have the rest of class to research and put your debate together. GO!

Which side of the argument would you like to make a speech for period 3

Closing Session
Check in! How prepared are you feeling? I’m going to cut apart the sign up sheet and draw debates from a hat. The first five will go TOMORROW!

Assessment
Formative (debate prep check in)

Differentiation
Interest (student choice of topics)

AP Lang: Persuasive Appeals

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI5 Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the structure an author uses in his or her exposition or argument, including whether the structure makes points clear, convincing, and engaging. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12L3 Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12L6 Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will examine various types of persuasive appeals and how they can be used as effective forms of rhetoric.

Opening Session
Let’s brainstorm together! You guys have heard of persuasive appeals before, and although you may not know the names, you’ve heard of logical fallacies before. Let’s make a T chart and list the types of effective persuasive appeals on one side and the wrong ways to argue on the other side!

Work Session
We’re going to start out today with a little exercise in argument. Grab a sheet of paper and at the top write down something you want to do but that you know for certain your parents will not allow. You might write down going to a party, dating someone, getting a tattoo, not going to college, or anything along those lines.

Then, on the front of the sheet of paper, brainstorm and write down all the reasons you know your parents will give you for saying no. Not just “because I’m your mom and that’s why,” but the real reasons they actually have.

Flip the paper over to the back and compose a letter to your parents convincing them to let you do the thing. You should consider each of the reasons your parents will say no, and then explain why each of those reasons is wrong.

Closing Session
Once our letters are done, I want to review the persuasive appeals. We will look at Logos, Pathos, and Ethos, and come up with examples of each.

Assessment
Formative (letters, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (student choice, scaffolded letters, graphic organizers)

Double Bubble Friday Trouble!

Standard:

  • RL.9-10.1. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

Learning Target: Students will begin working on their bubble-map art project in their groups.

Activator: The Beatles – Revolution

Today you’re going to be working on our art project for this unit! You will be working with your group, and we’re making a bubble map about your persuasive essay topic. Here’s the skinny:

  •  In the center of your bubble map, write your persuasuve essay topic. Make sure you include what side you’re on.
  • In each of the bubbles around your center, write one of the arguments for your side. For example, let’s say your topic is gun control, and you decide all guns should be banned. Your center bubble might say “All guns should be banned” and your outer bubbles might say “10,000 people die to guns in the US every year” or “Countries that ban guns have a very low incidence of death-by-gun.”
  • Beside each outer bubble, write a quote from one of your two articles or from The House of the Scorpion that backs up your argument. For example, if you write about the number of people that die every year, you might put a quote from an article that gives that statistic. Don’t forget your parenthetical citation.
  • You should use 5 bubbles. You may have a maximum of two quotes from each article or The House of the Scorpion.
  • When you finish, you’re going to put your bubble map onto wallpaper! I’ll show you examples of this in class, but it looks REALLY cool!!

On Monday, we’re going to be writing our first draft of our individual argumentative essays. On Tuesday we’re in the lab to type. Wednesday is test review, and after our Jeopardy! Game, you’ll have time to finish putting your bubble maps onto wallpaper. Enjoy! They look super cool when they’re done!!