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The Hero’s Journey!

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.) Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can examine the hero’s journey by considering examples from movies or books I’ve read so that I can apply the hero’s journey to The Alchemist.

Opening Session
READING QUIZ!!! We will open each day of this reading with a short, 5 question quiz. Do these on your own paper and HANG ON TO THEM, because you will turn them all in
together when we finish reading!

reading quiz to pg21

Work Session
Today we’re talking about a concept called The Hero’s Journey. This idea is that all stories follow the same framework, whether or not the authors intend to. We’re going to
start by watching a video that explains this pretty thoroughly:

The book we’re reading, The Alchemist, is a hero’s journey for the main character, Santiago.

Hero’s Journey

Let’s put a hero’s journey diagram on the board and see how some movies fit to it!

  • Shrek
  • Finding Nemo
  • Moana

Grab a sheet of paper (or you can use the back of today’s reading quiz) and draw the diagram. Choose a movie, book, or series you’ve seen/read and write down how it fits onto the hero’s journey diagram! Hang on to these in your notebook/journal because we will reference them throughout the unit 🙂

Closing Session
Continue your reading of The Alchemist to the end of page 47 (the end of part 1) 🙂

Assessment
Formative (reading quiz, hero quest class discussion)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding), Interest (hero quest movies)

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Magical Realism

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.) Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can examine the genre and themes of The Alchemist by participating in a class discussion so that I can gain a deeper understanding of the text.

Opening Session
Magical Realism
Magical_Realism_Power_Point

Work Session
Alchemist Value Line (yes/no/maybe) class discussion (students must defend their position on the value line)

The Alchemist Value Line questions

Vocab!!

  1. Alchemist
  2. sacristy
  3. pasture
  4. zenith
  5. seminary
  6. omen
  7. Philosopher’s Stone
  8. caravan
  9. primitive
  10. levanter

 

Closing Session

Now that we have some background information, it’s time to start the book! Read The Alchemist to the star on page 21 🙂

Assessment
Formative (class discussion, notes, value line)

Differentiation
Learning style (kinesthetic, visual)

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World Lit: The Handsomest Two Words

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Learning Target:

Students will closely analyze the development of a theme in “The Handsomest Drowned Man In The World” by Garcia Marquez by identifying evidence (quotes) from the text that show the theme, so that they can create an illustration for the story which visually depicts their chosen theme.

Students will closely analyze a theme in “Two Words” by Allende by choosing specific words and phrases that contribute to the development of the theme, so that they can write about the cumulative impact of those words and phrases on the text.

Language Objectives: 

Students will write a paragraph analyzing the theme of a short story using complete sentences.

Students will discuss the theme of a short story with their classmates using academic language.

Students will correctly punctuate the quotations they choose to use as evidence.

Opening Session:

We will open with a YouTube video that attempts to explain the magical realism genre: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShzOBA2kINk

After the video, I want to ask students what movies or books they might be familiar with that fall into the magical realism genre (Studio Ghibli animes and the Metal Gear video game franchise will be of interest to my students, in addition to others).

Work Session: Today we’re going to split the class in half and read a couple stores! So we’ll go around the room and number off 1 or 2. Half of you are going to read a story called “The Handsomest Drowned Man In The World” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and the other half are going to read a story  called “Two Words” by Isabel Allende.

Students will be split in half based on learning style, with half the class working on Isabel Allende’s “Two Words” and half the class working on Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s “The Handsomest Drowned Man In The World.” My coteacher and I will each read the designated short story aloud to the group while students follow along in the text. Then, students will be given a differentiated activity based on their language proficiency.

  • “Two Words” students will be given a writing assignment to compose a paragraph about how specific words and phrases reveal a theme in the text. This assignment will be scaffolded for ELL/SWD students using a sentence stems.
  • “Drowned Man” students will be given an artistic assignment to identify a theme in the story, choose a quote that shows that theme, and then draw an illustration for the quote that depicts the theme. Students will then write a brief paragraph describing how their illustration and quote show the theme of the story. This assignment will be scaffolded for ELL/SWD students using a framework for the paragraph and by help with identifying a theme.

Closing Session: Students will close the day by getting with a partner who read the opposite story they did. Students should summarize their story for each other, including explaining the theme of the story. Students can use their worksheets for reference, including using the sentence stems to push their discussion. Students will be formatively assessed by filling out a Ticket Out The Door that asks them to identify a theme in both of the stories.

Assessment: Illustrations/Paragraphs will be graded; group discussions will be formatively assessed for understanding.

Differentiation: Learning style (illustration for visual learners, movement and discussion for kinesethetic learners)

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World Lit: Women Do Everything, Depressing Study Finds

Standard:

Learning Target: I can analyze gender roles in today’s society by reading an article about who is expected to do housework so that I can deepen my understanding of the feminism movement.

Opening Session: Let’s make a T-Chart! I’m going to put “husband” on one side and “wife” on the other, then I want your help to fill it in. When it comes to “adulting,” what do you expect the husband to do and what to you expect the wife to do? Things like cleaning, paying bills, yardwork, etc.

Work Session:

We’re going to have a class discussion! I want to use a new strategy with you guys called Talking Chips. I’m going to give everyone three little plastic circles, which are your talking chips. Your job is to “spend” all three chips by the end of our discussion. You spend a chip by contributing to the discussion – making a comment, agreeing or disagreeing, asking a question, etc. Once your chips are gone, you need to yield the floor to other speakers! And if you still have chips, you should be finding a way to contribute!

Here’s the prompt for our discussion (it may sound familiar): What are the ideal “roles” for men and women in our society? In other words, what should women do/be like/look like/act like, and what should men do/be like/look like/act like? Who should take on what duties/roles inside the house? Who should take on what professions/roles outside the house? Are there any professions that either gender should NOT do/be allowed to do?

After our discussion, I want to read an article with you guys:

Women Are Literally Expected To Do All The Chores, Depressing Study Finds

https://splinternews.com/women-are-literally-expected-to-do-all-the-chores-depr-1793861364

Closing Session:

So, after our discussion and the article today, we can see that we still have some gender roles in 2019. What do you think about this? For your Ticket Out The Door, write down if you think these gender roles are more beneficial or more harmful to society.

Assessment:

Formative (TOTD, class discussion)

Differentiation:

Scaffolding, Learning style

 

 

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World Lit: Two Handsomest Drowned Words

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Learning Target: I will analyze a cultural experience reflected in a work of magical realist literature by drawing an illustration of a short story and then teaching that short story to my peers.

Opening Session: 

Work Session: Today we’re going to split the class in half and read a couple stores! So we’ll go around the room and number off 1 or 2. Half of you are going to read a story called “The Handsomest Drowned Man In The World” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and the other half are going to read a story that I’ve made copies of called “Two Words” by Isabel Allende.

After you finish reading your respective stories, we’re going to pass around the printer paper and I’d like everyone to choose a quote from your story and make an illustration of it. Write your quote on your paper along with your picture. You will turn these in, so be neat and creative!

When our drawings are complete, we’re going to jigsaw back together into groups of four. Each group should have 2 people that read each story. Your job is to teach your group members what happened in the story you read, and since we are in our feminism unit, you should focus specifically on the role of women in the story you read.

Closing Session: For your ticket out the door, write a short paragraph comparing and contrasting the two stories we read in class today. How do these magical realism stories differ in theme and representation of women?

Assessment: Illustrations will be graded; group discussions will be formatively assessed for understanding.

Differentiation: Learning style (illustration for visual learners, movement and discussion for kinesethetic learners)

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