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World Lit: Greek Hero Story DUE!!

Standard: 

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a research-based story about a Greek or Trojan hero.

Opening Session: MLA Format recap!

Work Session: 

YOUR STORY IS DUE TODAY!!!!!

In a well-organized story of about 750 words, depict a scene from the Trojan War starring your chosen character. You should not try to tell me the whole epic story of the ten year war – you can’t do that in 750 words. Instead, you should choose a single scene from the war and show your character in that scene. Your story should include dialogue, sensory language, action, and character development.

Choose one of the following:

  • Greeks:
    • Agamemnon, King of Kings
    • Ajax, Second Best Greek Soldier
    • Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife
    • Diomedes, another awesome Greek soldier
    • Helen
    • Hermione, Menalaus’s and Helen’s daughter
    • Iphigenia, Agamemnon’s daughter
    • Neoptolemus, Achilles’s son
    • Nestor, oldest warlord
    • Philoctedes, slayer of Paris
  • Trojans:
    • Aeneas, Hector’s second cousin and one of the survivors of Troy
    • Andromache, Hector’s wife
    • Cassandra, Priam and Hecuba’s daughter, Hector/Paris’s sister
    • Deiphobus, Hector’s brother (the one Athena pretended to be)
    • Hecuba, Priam’s wife
    • Helen
    • Oenone, Paris’s first wife
    • Polyxena, Hector’s sister who almost married Achilles

Closing Session:

TURN IT IN!!!

AssessmentSummative (stories will be graded)

Differentiation: Interest (choice of character)

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World Lit: Greek Hero Story!

Standard: 

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a research-based story about a Greek or Trojan hero.

Opening Session: Share out! Who did you decide to write about and what did you think was particularly cool about that person?

Work Session: 

In a well-organized story of about 750 words, depict a scene from the Trojan War starring your chosen character. You should not try to tell me the whole epic story of the ten year war – you can’t do that in 750 words. Instead, you should choose a single scene from the war and show your character in that scene. Your story should include dialogue, sensory language, action, and character development.

Choose one of the following:

  • Greeks:
    • Agamemnon, King of Kings
    • Ajax, Second Best Greek Soldier
    • Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife
    • Diomedes, another awesome Greek soldier
    • Helen
    • Hermione, Menalaus’s and Helen’s daughter
    • Iphigenia, Agamemnon’s daughter
    • Neoptolemus, Achilles’s son
    • Nestor, oldest warlord
    • Philoctedes, slayer of Paris
  • Trojans:
    • Aeneas, Hector’s second cousin and one of the survivors of Troy
    • Andromache, Hector’s wife
    • Cassandra, Priam and Hecuba’s daughter, Hector/Paris’s sister
    • Deiphobus, Hector’s brother (the one Athena pretended to be)
    • Hecuba, Priam’s wife
    • Helen
    • Oenone, Paris’s first wife
    • Polyxena, Hector’s sister who almost married Achilles

Closing Session:

Trade laptops with a friend and read each others’ stories! Give some constructive feedback on how things could improve.

AssessmentSummative (stories will be graded)

Differentiation: Interest (choice of character)

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World Lit: Greek Hero Research!

Standard: 

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a research-based story about a Greek or Trojan hero.

Opening Session: VOCAB QUIZ!!

Work Session: 

We’re going to start a new essay today! This one should be pretty fun, I hope. I want you to grab a laptop and do some research one a character from the Trojan War, then write me a story about that character’s adventures during the war. I’ve listed several for you to choose from. Although your story should be fictional, you should base on research about that character – for example, Cassandra has prophetic visions that no one believes are true (but in fact they are 100% accurate). If you write about Cassandra, you should include her gift of prophesy and her curse that no one believes her.

Choose one of the following:

  • Greeks:
    • Agamemnon, King of Kings
    • Ajax, Second Best Greek Soldier
    • Clytemnestra, Agamemnon’s wife
    • Diomedes, another awesome Greek soldier
    • Helen
    • Hermione, Menalaus’s and Helen’s daughter
    • Iphigenia, Agamemnon’s daughter
    • Neoptolemus, Achilles’s son
    • Nestor, oldest warlord
    • Philoctedes, slayer of Paris
  • Trojans:
    • Aeneas, Hector’s second cousin and one of the survivors of Troy
    • Andromache, Hector’s wife
    • Cassandra, Priam and Hecuba’s daughter, Hector/Paris’s sister
    • Deiphobus, Hector’s brother (the one Athena pretended to be)
    • Hecuba, Priam’s wife
    • Helen
    • Oenone, Paris’s first wife
    • Polyxena, Hector’s sister who almost married Achilles

In a well-organized story of about 750 words, depict a scene from the Trojan War starring your chosen character. You should not try to tell me the whole epic story of the ten year war – you can’t do that in 750 words. Instead, you should choose a single scene from the war and show your character in that scene. Your story should include dialogue, sensory language, action, and character development.

Closing Session:

Trade laptops with a friend and read each others’ stories! Give some constructive feedback on how things could improve.

AssessmentSummative (stories will be graded)

Differentiation: Interest (choice of character)

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World Lit: Iliad Test Day!

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will demonstrate their knowledge of The Iliad on a comprehensive unit test.

Opening Session
5 minute review! Ask any questions you need to so we can get right into our test!

Work Session
You will have the entire class period to work on your unit test. Good luck!

Closing Session
Unit feedback: I’m going to pass around some sticky notes. Please write down any feedback you have about this unit – what you liked, what you didn’t, what worked, what didn’t, and so on. You do NOT need to put your name on it. Stick them to the board on your way out!

Assessment
Summative (unit test)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, accomodations as needed on test)

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World Lit: Iliad Jeopardy!

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.) Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will review for their Iliad unit test by playing a review game of Jeopardy!.

Opening Session
Divide into teams! I need groups of 4 at the tables around the room, and we’re only going to have a non-4 group if we absolutely have to!
Within your teams, you need to number off 1-4. I’ll be calling “All the 1s can buzz in!” and “All the 2s can buzz in!” so you need to pay attention to when you’re eligible to ring in and question a Jeopardy answer.

Once you’re in your teams, choose your favorite Olympian god for your team name 🙂

Work Session
It’s time for ILIAD JEOPARDY!!

We will be playing exactly like real Jeopardy!. That means if you get a question wrong or buzz in and don’t know, you will LOSE points! Fun fact, Jeopardy! gets its name because when you answer a question, you’re in *jeopardy* (danger) of losing your money. Also, you must put your response in the form of a question. In the Jeopardy round I will remind you; in the Double Jeopardy round I will not.

Jeopardy Round: https://jeopardylabs.com/play/bristow-and-mellmans-ithe-iliadi-jeopardy

Double Jeopardy: https://jeopardylabs.com/play/bristow-and-mellmans-iliad-double-jeopardy

There are Daily Doubles available, and we will do a Final Jeopardy round at the end!

Closer
FINAL JEOPARDY!! Category is:
Your Teacher!

Assessment
Formative (Review game)

Differentiation
Process (heterogeneous groupings)

© Mrs. Bristow's Literature Classes