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World Lit: Revise and Share!

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a narrative about my childhood that begins to show my cultural identity through a story.

Opening Session: Grab a laptop! I want to quickly review how to set up your paper in MLA format and how to upload things to the class OneNote Notebook!

Work Session: You will have the entire work session today to work on revising and editing your cultural identity paper. I’ll come around and help everyone out as we go  🙂 You can also ask your tablemates for help and feedback, and actually I encourage you to do that!

Closing Session: For the last few minutes of class, I’ll share my cultural identity essay with you guys. I’ll also take a couple volunteers to read theirs. Tomorrow, we’re going to be doing a few more share outs, not a full on “everyone shares” kind of thing, but I’ll be asking for volunteers. If you think you might have something you want shared, get it ready for tomorrow! Also I’m willing to read yours if you want to share, but don’t want to do the public speaking thing 🙂

Assessment: Summative (cultural identity embedded assessment); formative (journal checks, discussion)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), product (varied essay length or prompt)

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American Lit: The Declaration of Independence

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI9 Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features. For British Literature, American Literature, and Multicultural Literature use comparable documents of historical significance.

Learning Target: I can analyze the Declaration of Independence for its purpose and rhetorical features.

Opening Session: Crash Course – Fourth of July Special

Work Session: Today we’re going to read one of the most important things ever written – and that’s not me exaggerating or being America-centric; it really did change the course of human history! The Declaration of Independence!

Together we will read Chunk 1, the introduction, and talk about what’s going on. Then, I’m going to give you each a paragraph out of the book and ask you to rewrite it in plain, modern English. Then we’ll come back together to read and summarize the conclusion.

We can do the Second Read questions together after we finish reading the document 🙂

Closing Session: Vocab review! Let’s look at the new vocab words for this week again and do a crossword puzzle together!

Assessment: Formative – class discussion

Differentiation: Process (varied length paragraphs for modern translations)

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World Lit: Workshop and revise!

Standard:

ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can workshop, revise, and create a new draft of my writing by working with a small group.

Opening Session: Let’s start out today with a little model of the writer’s workshop we’re going to do! I’ll sit in the middle of the room with two people and we will demonstrate how to do the workshop for everyone. Here are the rules:

  • Be quiet while your partner reads their work.
  • Say what worked FIRST.
  • Give some CONSTRUCTIVE criticism, like “I think this could be stronger” or “I didn’t understand this”
  • The author does NOT TALK. Seriously, shut your face!
  • After the readers discuss the author’s piece, the author should say thanks for sharing thoughts.
  • …Then move on to the next reader! 🙂

Work Session: After I model the workshop with a couple volunteers, I want you to do the same thing in your group. Each person should read their piece aloud, get some good feedback, say thanks, and then move along to the next author.

After we spend about 30 minutes workshopping, we’re going to take the rest of class to work on typing up our next drafts of our piece. Grab a laptop and start typing your I Remember piece, remembering that the ultimate goal here is to make it into a piece of writing that shows your cultural identity through story. You will also be able to work on this tomorrow, and we will share a little on Wednesday 🙂

Closing Session: For the last few minutes of class, I want to introduce you all to OneNote and make sure everyone has a passing understanding of how to use our class notebook. This will be how you turn everything in! Go ahead and practice by uploading your essay draft to your Cultural Identity Essay section 🙂

Assessment: Summative (Cultural Identity Embedded Assessment); Formative (workshop)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)

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American Lit: What Is Freedom?

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI8 Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses.)

Learning Target: I can analyze the use of rhetorical features in an argumentative text.

Opening Session: Schoolhouse Rock singing The Preamble to the United States Constitution:

Work Session: If you look around the room, you’ll see signs that say “The right to bear arms” and “the right to free speech”. Take a few minutes to read the signs, then go to the one you think is the most important. Be prepared to defend yourself! We’re going to have a little debate 🙂

After our debate, grab your textbook and open to page 53. Here is the actual, exact text of the Bill of Rights. When the framers of the Constitution were busy creating America, they wrote the Bill of Rights to guarantee what they considered the “top ten” most important things that should never be taken away from anyone.

I have three questions for you, and I’d like for you to respond with a Brief Constructed Response that answers them all:

  1. Why do you think the framers of the Constitution chose these ten rights to specifically enumerate?
  2. Other countries enjoy similar rights without having them as part of their constitution. Why do you think our framers made these ten rights so immutable?
  3. If the Bill of Rights were written today. which rights would be different from the ones the framers wrote in 1791?

Closing Session: VOCAB!! Get these words defined, you’ll have a quiz on Friday!

  1. Avid
  2. Chimera
  3. Drudgery
  4. Indomitable
  5. Procured
  6. Sap
  7. Shirtwaist
  8. Sterile
  9. Preamble
  10. Posterity

Assessment: Formative (class discussion, brief constructed response)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding)

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World Lit: I Remember…

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a narrative about my childhood that begins to show my cultural identity through a story.

Opening Session: Sounds every 2010s kid will remember…do y’all know these? Because I feel so old right now

Work Session: Get out the memory maps we did last week and take a few minutes to read through what you wrote. Then, share your map with a friend and chat about the memories you wrote down, which ones are most important, and which ones you might have forgotten until just now. We’re going to use this map to do your first draft of our cultural identity essay!

After everyone has a chance to chat, I want you to sit down and write a journal entry for me. Take about ten or fifteen minutes and write 4ish paragraphs, using this format:

I remember…

I remember…

I remember…

But mostly I remember…

Your end piece might diverge from that, but let’s start there. Fifteen minutes to write. Go!

When time is up, take a minute to grab a laptop and let’s log into OneNote and look at how this works! I am super excited for our class notebook 🙂

After a short OneNote lesson, go back to the journal entry you just wrote. Open up Microsoft Word. Take that brain-dump-journal-entry and use it as your jumping off point for your narrative essay about your cultural identity. Here is the full essay prompt:

Your assignment is to write a narrative essay of about 750 words explaining your cultural identity through a story. You should compose a thoughtful piece that shows your reader your cultural identity, rather than simply talking about it. Your paper should be typed in MLA format and uploaded to our class OneNote Notebook by the end of class on Friday, January 18th.

You will have the rest of class to work on your first draft of your paper. Tomorrow, we workshop!

Closing Session: VOCAB!!! Take ten minutes to copy these down and get their definitions. QUIZ ON FRIDAY!

  1. indignity
  2. reproach
  3. listlessly
  4. bellows
  5. mesmerizing
  6. trills
  7. arpeggio
  8. reverie
  9. fiasco
  10. nonchalantly

Assessment: Summative (cultural identity embedded assessment); formative (journal checks, discussion)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), product (varied essay length or prompt)

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