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AP Lang: The Declaration of Independence, Day 2

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI9 Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features. For British Literature, American Literature, and Multicultural Literature use comparable documents of historical significance.

Learning Target: I can analyze the Declaration of Independence for its historical significance and context, as well as consider its rhetorical features, persuasiveness, and the narrative voice of the author.

Opening Session: Continue reading Anthem. For today’s journal entry, consider Equality and his relationship with Liberty. What effect does Liberty have on Equality’s growing sense of independence? Does she seem to push him or hold him back?

Work Session:

Back to the Declaration of Independence today! We’re in the textbook on page 235. Yesterday we read the Declaration and discussed the questions on 239.

Today, I want you to open to a fresh page in your notebook. You’re going to be writing your own Declaration of Independence. You can declare yourself independent of anything you feel beholden to; for example, your family, OHS, a team or club, whatever. I would like for you to follow the format of the original Declaration of Independence, where you write out a list of grievances and then declare yourselves independent of them.

You’ll have the rest of class to do this, and tomorrow you will be trading papers with a partner, so make this good!

 

Closing Session:

Grab your copy of Anthem and flip to the back where you’ll find the facsimile edition of the text. Read through a few pages and take some time to consider what Rand changed in the book, what she left alone, and why she made those decisions. You’ll be editing a paper tomorrow, so think hard about these decisions an author has to make!

Assessment: Formative (Vocabulary quiz and journal check on Friday)

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolded questions)

Homework: Read 20 minutes in your Free Choice book; finish your Declaration if you did not do so in class.

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World Lit: Two Kinds, Day 1

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme. (bonus points: find some phrases in that learning target, whew!)

Opening Session: Amy Tan, the author of the story we’re going to read today, on writing from your own personal experience:

Work Session: Today we’re going to be reading a story called “Two Kinds,” an excerpt from The Joy Luck Club, a novel by Amy Tan. As you’ve guessed from the video, Tan is a Chinese-American woman, and her story is largely inspired by her own life.

Our goal today is to get through the first 4 chunks of the story, and then do the Second Read questions 1-4 on page 30. We’re going to go over these and of course frequently stop while we’re reading to talk, so I hope by the end of the day you have a solid handle on the story!

Closing Session: Let’s review our vocab list we got yesterday and make sure everyone was able to find the definitions!

Differentiation: Process (varied length reading passages)

Assessment: Informal – check of Second Read questions

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AP Lang: The Declaration of Independence, day 1

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI9 Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features. For British Literature, American Literature, and Multicultural Literature use comparable documents of historical significance.

Learning Target: I can analyze the Declaration of Independence for its historical significance and context, as well as consider its rhetorical features, persuasiveness, and the narrative voice of the author.

Opening Session: Continue reading Anthem. When the timer goes off, write a journal entry where you consider Equality’s growing independence and what you think independence means to him, versus what independence means to you as a teenager in modern America.

Work Session:

Today we’re reading one of the most important documents in American history, the Declaration of Independence. Obviously this document changed the course of history, right? So as we get into it, I want you to consider how the author, Thomas Jefferson, must have felt as he was writing it. Do you think he knew the last impact his words would have?

We’re going to read through the Declaration as a class, one paragraph at a time. Most of the paragraphs are little short things. After each paragraph, we’ll discuss what they mean, and then continue on. I expect this will take most of class, especially with vocabulary and all, but I also have several discussion questions to bring up with you as time allows.

We will continue our analysis of this document tomorrow, when you’ll be given a chance to do a little writing of your own!

Closing Session:

Vocabulary!

  1. ADROIT; adj
    1. Skillfull, expert in the use of the hands or mind
  2. AMICABLE; adj.
    1. Peaceful, friendly
  3. AVERSE; adj.
    1. Having a deep-seated distaste; opposed, unwilling
  4. BELLIGERENT; adj/n
    1. Given to fighting, warlike, combative, aggrssive
    2. One at war, one engaged in war
  5. BENEVOLENT; adj
    1. Kind, charitable
  6. CURSORY; adj
    1. Hasty, not thorough
  7. DUPLICITY; n
    1. Treachery, deceitfulness
  8. EXTOL; v
    1. To praise extravagantly
  9. FEASIBLE; adj
    1. Possible, able to be done
  10. GRIMACE; n/v
    1. A wry face, facial distortion
    2. To make a wry face
  11. HOLOCAUST; n
    1. A large-scale destruction, especially by fire; a vast slaughter; a burnt offering
  12. IMPERVIOUS; adj
    1. Not affected or hurt by; admitting of no passage or entrance
  13. IMPETUS; n
    1. A moving force, impulse, stimulus
  14. JEOPARDY; n.
    1. danger
  15. METICULOUS; adj
    1. Extremely careful; particular about details
  16. NOSTALGIA; n
    1. A longing for something past; homesickness
  17. QUINTESSENCE; n
    1. The purest essence or form of something; the most typical example
  18. RETROGRESS; v
    1. To move backward; to return to an earlier condition
  19. SCRUTINIZE; v
    1. To examine closely
  20. TEPID; adj
    1. Lukewarm; unenthusiastic, marked by an absence of interest

Assessment: Formative (Vocabulary quiz and journal check on Friday)

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolded questions)

Homework: Read 20 minutes in your Free Choice book; write a journal entry where you consider how Jefferson might have felt as he drafted the Declaration of Independence.

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AP Lang:Living Like Weasels, Day 5

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Learning Target:  I can critically examine a text for details that support my analysis of the inferences I draw from the text.

Opening Session: After our 20 minutes of independent reading today, I’d like to pass out copies of a very important rubric. This is the AP writing rubric, which is graded on a scale of 1 to 9. One of my goals this semester is for you to become really familiar with this rubric, because if you can make a 9 on this rubric, you can write a seriously good essay. So let’s go over the rubric, and then we’re going to write our first essay of the semester!

Work Session: Grab a sheet of paper and write a pseudonym (a fake name) at the top. You’re going to write a different pseudonym on every essay, and these can be anything you’d like (I used to write World of Warcraft characters on mine when I was in high school, but you do you). You will NOT put your real name down.

Your prompt for this essay is:

What point is Dillard making by calling this essay “Living Like Weasels”? Consider how the weasel lives and what drives its day-to-day life versus that of humans, and consider if humans have a choice in how we live our lives. Good essays will explore symbolism representing the potential choices one can make in how they live their lives.

You will have 40 minutes to work on this essay, then I’ll collect them and redistribute, and we will grade them together as a class.

You’ll have ten minutes to read the essay and assign it a grade, then we will discuss!

Closing Session:

VOCAB QUIZ! I’ll give you a sheet with twelve of your vocab words on them. You need to know a definition or synonym to ten of the twelve words to get a 100%. If you know more than 10, you get extra credit.

Assessment: Essays and vocab quizzes will be graded.

Differentiation: Extended time as needed, modified/scaffolded prompt.

Homework: Read 20 minutes in your Free Choice book.

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World Lit: Exploring Cultural Identity, Day 2

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RI2 Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: I can compare and contrast how a central idea of a text is developed in an informational text and a personal essay.

Opening Session: Ten Awesome Young Adult Novels!

Work Session: 

We’re going to start out today with a by writing an extended constructed response to the readings we did yesterday. Flip in your text to page 13 and read the explanatory text prompt. This will be your first crack at writing what is basically an essay in here, but it’s short and sweet, so hopefully not a big deal. Things to remember:

  • Put your MLA Heading on the top of your paper (Your name, my name, class name, date – you will head all your papers this way)
  • Write 2-3 paragraphs. Make sure you include an introduction, body, and conclusion, though you need not put each of those in its own paragraph.
  • Do not write more than the space provided
  • Your handwriting has to be legible
  • Make sure you cite evidence from the texts to make your point! Use MLA citations (Author #) to show where your quotes came from.

After you finish writing your essay, we’re going to do a little book talk! I want to spend some time going around the room and sharing what books we’ve been reading this week. I’m in the middle of Looking For Alaska by John Green, and I’m happy to share it with you! I’d love to hear what you’ve been digging into during our independent reading!

Closing Session: Finally, I want to introduce the Alternative Book Reports we will be doing for your independent reading this year. You’ll be doing 3 over the course of the semester, with each one due at the end of the six week grading period. I realize you’ll probably read more than one book over six weeks, but in this case you can just choose your favorite!

Differentiation: Interest (student choice in books); Process (scaffolded essay if needed).

Assessment: Formal – essays will be graded.

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