World Lit: The Handsomest Two Words

Standard:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.

Learning Target:

Students will closely analyze the development of a theme in “The Handsomest Drowned Man In The World” by Garcia Marquez by identifying evidence (quotes) from the text that show the theme, so that they can create an illustration for the story which visually depicts their chosen theme.

Students will closely analyze a theme in “Two Words” by Allende by choosing specific words and phrases that contribute to the development of the theme, so that they can write about the cumulative impact of those words and phrases on the text.

Language Objectives: 

Students will write a paragraph analyzing the theme of a short story using complete sentences.

Students will discuss the theme of a short story with their classmates using academic language.

Students will correctly punctuate the quotations they choose to use as evidence.

Opening Session:

We will open with a YouTube video that attempts to explain the magical realism genre: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ShzOBA2kINk

After the video, I want to ask students what movies or books they might be familiar with that fall into the magical realism genre (Studio Ghibli animes and the Metal Gear video game franchise will be of interest to my students, in addition to others).

Work Session: Today we’re going to split the class in half and read a couple stores! So we’ll go around the room and number off 1 or 2. Half of you are going to read a story called “The Handsomest Drowned Man In The World” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez and the other half are going to read a story  called “Two Words” by Isabel Allende.

Students will be split in half based on learning style, with half the class working on Isabel Allende’s “Two Words” and half the class working on Gabriel Garcia Marquez’s “The Handsomest Drowned Man In The World.” My coteacher and I will each read the designated short story aloud to the group while students follow along in the text. Then, students will be given a differentiated activity based on their language proficiency.

  • “Two Words” students will be given a writing assignment to compose a paragraph about how specific words and phrases reveal a theme in the text. This assignment will be scaffolded for ELL/SWD students using a sentence stems.
  • “Drowned Man” students will be given an artistic assignment to identify a theme in the story, choose a quote that shows that theme, and then draw an illustration for the quote that depicts the theme. Students will then write a brief paragraph describing how their illustration and quote show the theme of the story. This assignment will be scaffolded for ELL/SWD students using a framework for the paragraph and by help with identifying a theme.

Closing Session: Students will close the day by getting with a partner who read the opposite story they did. Students should summarize their story for each other, including explaining the theme of the story. Students can use their worksheets for reference, including using the sentence stems to push their discussion. Students will be formatively assessed by filling out a Ticket Out The Door that asks them to identify a theme in both of the stories.

Assessment: Illustrations/Paragraphs will be graded; group discussions will be formatively assessed for understanding.

Differentiation: Learning style (illustration for visual learners, movement and discussion for kinesethetic learners)

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