World Lit:Welcome to the Hero’s Journey!

Standards:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.
  • ELAGSE9-10W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content.

Objective: Students will be able to synthesize the concept of the hero’s journey with the everyday world around them and understand how authors use the hero’s journey as a trope in world literature.

Opening Session: After Independent Reading, I would like everyone to write a short paragraph describing something that you fear. Be specific in what you’re afraid of, and explain why it scares you.

Work Session: After we consider what we’re afraid of and why, and maybe have a couple of people share their paragraphs, we’re going to talk about a concept called the Hero’s Journey. Let’s start with a video!

https://www.ted.com/talks/matthew_winkler_what_makes_a_hero

After our video, let’s get more specific about what the hero’s journey entails. I have a PowerPoint that’ll go over the details of the journey:

heroandquest Hero’s Journey

Closing Session: Let’s close the day by looking at some famous examples of the Hero’s Journey – how about some movies? We will make a hero’s journey chart together for the movies Finding Nemo, Moana, and The Lion King.

Assessment Strategies: Formative (paragraph checks, discussion participation)

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolding, high-interest topics, learning styles)

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