American Lit: Speaking Out

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: I can research the historical context of a literary work to understand the social commentary it is presenting.

Opening Session: Crash Course: McCarthyism

Work Session: Welcome to Tuesday! Today we’re discussing what The Crucible is really about – witch hunts. No, not like that! It’s REALLY a social commentary on America in the 1950s. To get a handle on this, let’s read an article on page 149 of your Springboard book, entitled “Why I Wrote the Crucible” by Arthur Miller (spoiler alert, he wrote The Crucible). We will learn what he was intending to do with his work and get some historical context.

After we read this, I want to start working on your first embedded assessment for this unit. Grab a partner (everyone needs a partner!) who you want to work with for this assignment, and start brainstorming a social issue you want to tackle in your first embedded assessment, which is writing and performing a scene for the class.

We will discuss some social issue options first, and then you will work with your partner to choose one and start considering options for how you will present it in your scene. You will need to turn this in at the end of the day.

Closing Session: TOTD: What was Miller’s purpose in writing The Crucible?

Assessment: EA1 will be formally assessed

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), Student Choice

Leave a Reply

© Mrs. Bristow's Literature Classes
CyberChimps