GO LADY CARDINALS!!!!!!

I hope everyone enjoyed their long weekend! I know I had fun for mine 🙂 And more importantly, tonight is our VARSITY VOLLEYBALL HOME GAME!!!!!!!!! Come out and support our ladies while we kick some Cambridge butt!!! Third block, wish Nicole luck!

Standard: RI.9-10.8. Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning.

Learning Target: Students will read a nonfiction article comparing the Genesis flood to the flood in Gilgamesh, and learn about bias and finding reliable sources.

Activator: Shrek!

…and why are we watching Shrek today? What kind of story is that?

Welcome to a shiny new week, everyone! Today we’re going to be continuing with our discussion of Gilgamesh, and reading a lil bit of nonfiction about it 🙂 I found this article online that compares the flood we read about in Gilgamesh to the flood that’s written in the book of Genesis in the Bible. There is a lot of controversy over which story came first – Gilgamesh or Genesis – and this article talks a little about why it’s so important to so many people. However, one thing we need to consider when we read articles – especially ones from the internet – is something called bias.

bi·as 

/ˈbīəs/

Noun:
Prejudice in favor of or against one thing, person, or group compared with another, usually in a way considered to be unfair.
Verb:
Show prejudice for or against (someone or something) unfairly: “the tests were biased against women”; “a biased view of the world”.
Synonyms:
noun.  prejudice – inclination – partiality – tendency
verb.  influence – prejudice

Interesting concept, right? If an author is prejudiced, or biased, towards one side or another, sometimes that belief comes across in their writing. It’s important for us, as scholars, to realize when an author is biased. Just because an author is biased does not mean they’re wrong – so don’t think I’m saying that – but it does mean that they’re unwilling to consider another point of view, or at least that they’re not considering another point of view in this particular piece.

Do you think an author can really make a good argument if they refuse to consider any other points of view? Do you think the author of this article is willing to look at the other side of things?

We’ll talk about what this means today while we read the article together and answer some questions 🙂 And then… We need to get back to House of the Scorpion! So we’ll end the day on a chapter of that 🙂

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