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World Lit: Legal Alien

Standard:ELAGSE9-10RL4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the cumulative impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone (e.g., how the language evokes a sense of time and place; how it sets a formal or informal tone.)

ELAGSE9-10RL5 Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.

Learning Target: I can analyze a particular point of view regarding a cultural experience represented in poetry, and analyze how the author chose to structure that poem for effect.

Opening Session: Uno Dos Tres, One Two Three by Pat Mora

Work Session: Welcome back! Today we are going to finish activity 1.6 in our text, which concludes with a poem by Pat Mora entitled “Legal Alien.” Before we read the poem, let’s review quickly what we talked about yesterday.

Next, let’s read this poem. I think every poem needs to be read at least twice to really hear it, so let’s start by silently reading it to ourselves, then I’d like two volunteers to read it aloud. After that, let’s discuss, and then do the Second Read questions together (you don’t have to write it down). After our discussion, I’d love for you to try your hand at writing a poem like this one! Check out the creative writing prompt on page 42, and go for it!

Closing Session: With ten minutes left of class, we are going to do our first vocab quiz. I’ll hand out the quizzes, you take ’em real fast, and turn them in – then HAVE A GREAT WEEKEND!

Assessment: Informal – class discussion, poetry; Formal – vocab quiz

Differentiation: Product (scaffolded quizzes); Interest (student volunteers to read)

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AP Lang: The Declaration of Independence, Day 4

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI9 Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features. For British Literature, American Literature, and Multicultural Literature use comparable documents of historical significance.

Learning Target: I can analyze the Declaration of Independence for its historical significance and context, as well as consider its rhetorical features, persuasiveness, and the narrative voice of the author.

Opening Session: Finish reading Anthem if you have not already. Then review the AP Essay Rubric for your in-class essay today.

Work Session:

Grab a sheet of paper and write a pseudonym (a fake name) at the top. You’re going to write a different pseudonym on every essay, and these can be anything you’d like (I used to write World of Warcraft characters on mine when I was in high school, but you do you). You will NOT put your real name down.

Your prompt for this essay is:

Write an essay in which you defend or challenge Jefferson’s characterization of the “self-evident truths” that he proclaims. (In other words, do you think the truths really are self-evident? What does that even mean? Why are they / are they not self evident?) Use evidence from your reading, observation, or experience to develop your position.

You will have 40 minutes to work on this essay, then I’ll collect them and redistribute, and we will grade them together as a class.

You’ll have ten minutes to read the essay and assign it a grade, then we will discuss!

 

Closing Session:

IDK if you know, but there’s also multiple choice questions on the AP Test! So we’re going to close out the day today by doing some practice multiple choice questions and then going over them as a class 🙂

Assessment: Formative (Vocabulary quiz and journal check on Friday)

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolded questions)

Homework: Read 20 minutes in your Free Choice book; finish the AP selected response questions if you didn’t in class.

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AP Lang: The Declaration of Independence, Day 3

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI9 Analyze foundational U.S. documents of historical and literary significance (including The Declaration of Independence, the Preamble to the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address) for their themes, purposes, and rhetorical features. For British Literature, American Literature, and Multicultural Literature use comparable documents of historical significance.

Learning Target: I can analyze the Declaration of Independence for its historical significance and context, as well as consider its rhetorical features, persuasiveness, and the narrative voice of the author.

Opening Session: Continue reading Anthem. You’re probably getting close to finishing at this point, and if you do, just switch to reading your Free Choice book in class.

Work Session:

Yesterday in class you wrote your own Declaration of Independence. Today, I would like for you to get with one partner (if we have an odd number, we can do one group of 3) and trade papers. Take five minutes or so to read your partner’s essay. Then, we’re going to spend ten or fifteen minutes doing a peer critique. Take a moment to jot down some notes and feedback for your partner. Consider the things we saw Rand change in the facsimile edition of Anthem. I’ll pass around some post-it notes so you don’t have to write on your partner’s paper. Once you’ve written some notes, I want you two to have a critical discussion about each others’ writing, and find some areas where you can improve or strengthen your Declaration.

After you’ve had a while to confer and then edit your own work, trade papers again with your neighbor. This time it’s not for a critique, but for a response. Consider how your partner has chosen to declare themselves independent, and then write a 1-2 paragraph response. Pretend you’re whomever is the target of your partner’s letter and respond to the grievances filed against you and your partner’s newly-declared independence.

You’ll have until just before the end of class to finish, when we will take some time to share 🙂

Closing Session:

Share out! Let’s have a couple partnerships share their declarations and responses with the class!

Assessment: Formative (Vocabulary quiz and journal check on Friday)

Differentiation: Process (Scaffolded questions)

Homework: Read 20 minutes in your Free Choice book; write a journal entry in which you pretend you’re King George III of England and write a response to Jefferson’s Declaration of Independence.

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World Lit: The Life and Times of Frida Kahlo

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL7 Analyze the representation of a subject or a key scene in two different artistic mediums (e.g., Auden’s poem “Musée de Beaux Arts” and Breughel’s painting Landscape with the Fall of Icarus), including what is emphasized or absent in each treatment.

Learning Target: I can analyze a particular point of view regarding a cultural experience expressed in literature and art.

Opening Session: Check out this video from PBS America, a clip from The Life and Times of Frida

Work Session: Okay, let’s dive into this excerpt from the biography of Frida Kahlo! As we read, you’re going to use metacognitive markers to mark the text:

  • put a ? when you have a question
  • put an ! when you have a strong reaction to something in the text
  • put a * when you have comment to make
  • underline any key ideas or details

After we go over this and talk about where we marked things, we are going to check out some artwork by Frida Kahlo. This painting is called Self-Portrait on the Borderline Between Mexico and the United States.

We’ll examine this painting using the OPTIC strategy! I’m just full of strategies today! OPTIC stands for

  • Overview: Write notes on what the visual appears to be about
  • Parts: Zoom in on the parts of the visual and describe any elements or details that seem important
  • Title: Highlight the title if you can
  • Interrelationships: Use the title as the theory and the parts of the visual as clues to detect and specify how the elements of the graphic are related
  • Conclusion: Draw a conclusion about the visual as a whole. What does the visual mean? Summarize the message of the visual in 1-2 sentences

After we discuss the painting, I want you to flip in your book back to page 35 and work on the Second Read questions. Remember that you should flip back to the text while answering these questions!

Closing Session: Let’s end the day with a book talk – I’ll share what I’m reading now, and I’d love to hear from one or two of you guys as well!

Assessment: Informal – class discussion, check of Second Read questions

Differentiation: Learning style (painting versus text); Process (scaffolded questions)

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World Lit: Two Kinds, Day 2

Standard: ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text.

ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Target: I can analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme.

Opening Session: Amy Tan reads her storybook Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat to Elmo and Zoe on Sesame Street!

Work Session: Ok, we’re picking right back up where we left off yesterday with chunks 5 -7 (pg. 26) of “Two Kinds”! When we finish the story, and of course discuss, we will also finish up the Second Read questions on page 30. We will also do the chart on 32…but we’re going to skip the essay, since you just did one on Friday!

Closing Session: Let’s end the day with a book talk! I’ll share what I’m reading, and I’d love to hear from volunteers!

Assessment: Informal check of questions and chart

Differentiation: Product (scaffolded questions)

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