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World Lit: Flood Comparison Essay, Day 1

Standards
ELAGSE9-10W2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas, concepts, and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection,
organization, and analysis of content. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.a Introduce a topic; organize complex ideas, concepts, and information to make important connections and distinctions; include formatting (e.g., headings),
graphics (e.g., figures, tables), and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.b Develop the topic with well-chosen, relevant, and sufficient facts, extended definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples
appropriate to the audience’s knowledge of the topic. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.c Use appropriate and varied transitions to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships among complex ideas and
concepts. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.d Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to manage the complexity of the topic. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.e Establish and maintain an appropriate style and objective tone. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10W2.f Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the information or explanation presented (e.g., articulating implications or the
significance of the topic). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will begin to write an essay comparing and contrasting the two flood stories we have read in class, and analyzing why they are so similar.

Opening Session
Grab a laptop! I want to quickly go over how to set up your paper in MLA format with the correct font, spacing, and heading. I’ll also review how to save your work under your student number so you can upload it to our class google drive.

Work Session
Okay! Today we’re going to begin writing our first essay together. I want you to take a closer look at the two flood stories we’ve read together, the flood from Gilgamesh and the flood from Genesis. As we’ve discussed, both stories are very similar, but they do have some minor differences. Also, there is some major controversy surrounding which story came first.

In a well organized essay of about 500 words, compare and contrast the two flood stories and analyze why you think they are so similar. You can use the articles we read on Friday as additional sources. You should cite quotes from at least 3 of your 4 available sources (Gilgamesh, Noah, and the two articles we read). You should explain to your reader both the similarities and differences in the stories, AND you should analyze WHY the two pieces are so similar.

Your essay will be due at the end of class tomorrow. Although there is not a required number of paragraphs, you should know that 500 words is about 4 or 5 paragraphs, depending on how long you make them.

Closing Session
To close out the day, I’ll call your attention back to the board and show everyone how to upload your essay to the class google drive, tinyurl.com/BristowWorldLit. This will be how you turn in all your essays for my class.

Assessment Strategies
Summative (essay)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding)

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AP Lang: Is the American Dream Still Alive?

Standards
ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE11-12W8 Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE11-12SL1 Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions(one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE11-12SL4 Present information, findings, and supporting evidence, conveying a clear and distinct perspective, such that listeners can follow the line of reasoning, alternative or opposing perspectives are addressed, and the organization, development, substance, and style are appropriate to purpose, audience, and a range or formal and informal tasks. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze various definitions and perspectives on the American Dream.

Opening Session
Let’s get into groups and discuss the American Dream! Silently 🙂

In groups of four, I want you to grab a sheet of paper and answer the question “What is the American Dream?” After everyone has had a chance to write, about five minutes, you should pass the note to your neighbor. Respond to what your classmate wrote, and add your own commentary. We’ll pass notes about 3 times and then come back together as a group.

Work Session
After we do our little note passing activity, let’s see what the internet thinks. Grab your phone and write down a definition for the American Dream as given to you by google.

What do these definitions have in common with the discussions we had earlier today?

We’ll have a class discussion on what exactly the American Dream is, and more importantly, if the American Dream is alive or not. You’ll need to defend your position and explain yourself to your classmates.

Closing Session
We’re going to be doing a group project over the next week or so, so let’s go ahead and divide into groups! You should sit with your group tomorrow when you come in, and on Wednesday we will start the group project.

Assessment
Formative (passing notes activity)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning styles)

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World Lit: The Flood of Noah and the Flood of Utnapishtim

Standards
ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10RI3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and
developed, and the connections that are drawn between them. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. Georgia ELA

Objective
Students will read Noah’s flood story from Genesis and then anylyze two articles that draw different conclusions from comparisons of the same texts.

Activator
Noah’s Ark Disney Storybook Video:

Work Session
Today we’re going to be reading another flood story, much like the one we read yesterday, but this one might be a little more familiar to you. The story is from Genesis, chapters 6-9, and is the story of Noah’s Ark.

We’re going to read the story aloud together, and then do a quick discussion just to make sure everyone knows what’s going on. Afterwards, I want us to consider how the two flood stories we’ve read over the past couple days are similar or different. We can make a venn diagram, or we can just talk about it 🙂

I have two articles for you guys to read. The first is entitled “The Flood of Noah and the Flood of Gilgamesh” and comes to us from the Institute for Creation Research (http://www.icr.org/article/noah-flood-gilgamesh/). The second is called “Before Noah: Flood Myths Are Older Than the Bible” and is from Time Magazine (http://time.com/44631/noah-christians-flood-aronofsky/). These articles both compare the two versions of the flood story and draw two different conclusions.

Why do you think these articles read the same stories and interpreted them in vastly different ways? What was each article’s intended audience? Do you think anyone reading either article changed their minds about which story came first?

Closing Session
To close out today, I want everyone to grab a sheet of paper (a half sheet is fine) and write a short paragraph on these two articles. Analyze the author’s motives and purpose in writing these two articles, consider if either author is biased, and theorize why they come to two exact opposite conclusions.

Assessment
Formative (paragraphs, class discussions)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning styles)

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AP Lang: Columbus Trial, Day 2

Standards
ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE11-12RI3 Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. Georgia ELA

Objective
Students will read a new perspective on the arrival of Columbus in 1492 and analyze and debate the information presented.

Opening Session
Write a paragraph recapping the information we read and discussed yesterday, then turn and share with a partner.

Work Session
Today we’re going to get into 5 groups, and I’ll give each group an indictment. The indictment will detail why someone is responsible for the deaths of the Taino people. Your responsibility (with your group) is twofold: You should defend yourself against the accusations, AND you should explain who you think is really responsible and why. You can choose to plead guilty, but you can’t be solely responsible – you have to accuse at least one other person.

I’ll give everyone about ten or fifteen minutes to formulate their arguments, and then you will need to convince your classmates in a debate!
After everyone has had a chance to say their piece, accuse their friends, and defend themselves, we will determine as a class who ultimately should be held responsible.

Closing Session
Revisit the paragraph we wrote earlier and revise it with whom you believe should be held responsible.

Assessment Strategies
Summative (Paragraphs); Formative (Class Debate)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, learning styles)

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AP Lang: Columbus Trial, Day 1

Standards
ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
ELAGSE11-12RI3 Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text. Georgia ELA

Objective
Students will read a new perspective on the arrival of Columbus in 1492 and analyze the information.

Opening Session
We’re going to start out with a KWL Chart! You don’t have to write the chart down, but you certainly can if you’re a note-taking type. We’re going to be writing about Columbus’s arrival in Hispaniola in 1492. Right now, let’s do the Know and the Want-to-know sections of the chart.

Work Session
Today we’re going to be reading a text about the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492 (Columbus sailed the ocean blue…) in Hispaniola. When Columbus arrived, between one and three MILLION Taino people lost their lives. The text we’re reading today will offer a different perspective on the “Sailed the ocean blue” story.

After we have a chance to read, I want everyone to discuss with your tables what we just read. Was anything surprising or shocking? Did you know this information before now? Why do you think you hadn’t learned it before this point?

After we get a chance to discuss with our tables, we’ll open it up to a whole-class discussion.

Closing Session
Let’s end the class by finishing the Learned part of the KWL chart!

Assessment Strategies
Formative (Class discussion)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding)

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