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World Lit: Things Fall Apart, Day 8

Standards:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Targets:

  • I can analyze the particular point of view of Things Fall Apart, a piece of literature from the Ibo culture of Africa.
  • I can analyze the development of the character Okonkwo and consider how his character helps develop the overall theme of Things Fall Apart.

Opening (do as soon as independent reading ends): 10 minutes

  • VOCAB QUIZ!!!!

Work Session Part 1: Reading (20 minutes)

  • Find Chapters 22-25 of Things Fall Apart. 
  • Find your last Literary Circle Job!!
  • Once everyone has their chosen job, read today’s chapters with your group.
  • When you are done reading, move on to part 2.

Work Session Part 2: Working (10 minutes)

  • Do your Literary Circle Job on your own. You can use classroom resources (such as a dictionary) to help you, but you do not need to talk with your classmates.
  • If you finish before the rest of your group, help your other group members with their jobs. When everyone is done, move on to part 3.

Work Session Part 3: Sharing (10 minutes)

  • Go around your group and share what you wrote down. Discuss what you think it means and why it is important.
  • Find the small box on the page for each of your group members’ roles. Take notes over what your group member is saying in the small box.
  • Make sure you understand what your group members are saying, because I might call on you to share!

Closing Session: 10 minutes

Maybe not a chapter, but… Things Fall Apart ends with the District Commissioner saying “One could almost write a whole chapter on [Okonkwo]. Perhaps not a whole chapter but a reasonable paragraph, at any rate” (Achebe 209). Imagine you are the District Commissioner, and write the “reasonable paragraph” about Okonkwo that he would put in his book.

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American Lit: Into the Wild, Day 8

Standards:

  • ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • ELAGSE11-12RI3 Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

Learning Targets:

  • I can analyze the life and death of Chris McCandless, considering why he felt called to live alone in the wilderness and why his story resonates with so many people.
  • I can analyze how Jon Krakauer tells the story of Chris McCandless, from a journalist’s and outdoorsman’s point of view, and consider areas of the text where the author seems particularly biased or objective.

Opening (do as soon as independent reading ends): 10 minutes

  • VOCAB QUIZ!!!!

Work Session Part 1: Reading (20 minutes)

  • Find pages 200-212 of Into the Wild.
  • Find your final Literary Circle Job ever!
  • Once everyone has their chosen job, read today’s chapters with your group.
  • When you are done reading, move on to part 2.

Work Session Part 2: Working (10 minutes)

  • Find the page with your Literary Circle Job on it. Write the chapters you’re working on at the top of the page.
  • Do your Literary Circle Job on your own. You can use classroom resources (such as a dictionary) to help you, but you do not need to talk with your classmates.
  • If you finish before the rest of your group, help your other group members with their jobs. When everyone is done, move on to part 3.

Work Session Part 3: Sharing (10 minutes)

  • Go around your group and share what you wrote down. Discuss what you think it means and why it is important.
  • Find a small box on the page for each of your group members’ roles. Take notes over what your group member is saying in the small box.
  • Make sure you understand what your group members are saying, because I might call on you to share!

Closing Session: 10 minutes

  • Noble or Nuts? – In the Author’s Note, Krakauer comments, “Some readers admired the boy immensely for his courage and noble ideals; other fulminated that he was a reckless idiot, a wacko, a narcissist who perished out of ignorance.” What do you think? Write a paragraph summarizing your opinion.

     

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American Lit: Into the Wild, Day 7

Standards:

  • ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.
  • ELAGSE11-12RI3 Analyze a complex set of ideas or sequence of events and explain how specific individuals, ideas, or events interact and develop over the course of the text.

Learning Targets:

  • I can analyze the life and death of Chris McCandless, considering why he felt called to live alone in the wilderness and why his story resonates with so many people.
  • I can analyze how Jon Krakauer tells the story of Chris McCandless, from a journalist’s and outdoorsman’s point of view, and consider areas of the text where the author seems particularly biased or objective.

Opening (do as soon as independent reading ends): 10 minutes

  • Examining Author’s Bias – Krakauer says in the Author’s Note,  “I won’t claim to be an impartial biographer. McCandless’s strange tale struck a personal note that made a dispassionate rendering of the tragedy impossible.” Look through Into the Wild and find a quote where Krakauer is showing his bias. Write the quote on your sheet.

Work Session Part 1: Reading (20 minutes)

  • Find pages 187-199 of Into the Wild.
  • Find your third Literary Circle Job!
  • Once everyone has their chosen job, read today’s chapters with your group.
  • When you are done reading, move on to part 2.

Work Session Part 2: Working (10 minutes)

  • Find the page with your Literary Circle Job on it. Write the chapters you’re working on at the top of the page.
  • Do your Literary Circle Job on your own. You can use classroom resources (such as a dictionary) to help you, but you do not need to talk with your classmates.
  • If you finish before the rest of your group, help your other group members with their jobs. When everyone is done, move on to part 3.

Work Session Part 3: Sharing (10 minutes)

  • Go around your group and share what you wrote down. Discuss what you think it means and why it is important.
  • Find a small box on the page for each of your group members’ roles. Take notes over what your group member is saying in the small box.
  • Make sure you understand what your group members are saying, because I might call on you to share!

Closing Session: 10 minutes

More Transcendentalism – Imagine you’re a transcendentalist being interviewed by a journalist like Krakauer. How would you answer the following questions?

  1. What is your view of society?
  1. What is your view of authority?
  1. Do you have an optimistic or pessimistic view of life? Why?
  1. Do you view man as inherently good, evil, or somewhere in between? Why?
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World Lit: Things Fall Apart, Day 7

Standards:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Targets:

  • I can analyze the particular point of view of Things Fall Apart, a piece of literature from the Ibo culture of Africa.
  • I can analyze the development of the character Okonkwo and consider how his character helps develop the overall theme of Things Fall Apart.

Opening (do as soon as independent reading ends): 10 minutes

  • Static or Dynamic? A static character is a character who does not change over the course of a story. A dynamic character is one who does change during a story. Is Okonkwo a static character or a dynamic character? Circle your answer, then find some evidence (a quote) from the book that backs you up.

    STATIC                                                              DYNAMIC

    Quote: “________________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________________” (Achebe ____).

Work Session Part 1: Reading (20 minutes)

  • Find Chapters 19-21 of Things Fall Apart. 
  • Find your next Literary Circle Job for this round.
  • Once everyone has their chosen job, read today’s chapters with your group.
  • When you are done reading, move on to part 2.

Work Session Part 2: Working (10 minutes)

  • Do your Literary Circle Job on your own. You can use classroom resources (such as a dictionary) to help you, but you do not need to talk with your classmates.
  • If you finish before the rest of your group, help your other group members with their jobs. When everyone is done, move on to part 3.

Work Session Part 3: Sharing (10 minutes)

  • Go around your group and share what you wrote down. Discuss what you think it means and why it is important.
  • Find the small box on the page for each of your group members’ roles. Take notes over what your group member is saying in the small box.
  • Make sure you understand what your group members are saying, because I might call on you to share!

Closing Session: 10 minutes

Before and After – Consider how the village of Umuofia changed after the Europeans arrived. Make a T-chart  with the differences in Umofia before Europeans and after Europeans.

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World Lit: Things Fall Apart, Day 6

Standards:

  • ELAGSE9-10RL6 Analyze a particular point of view or cultural experience reflected in a work of literature from outside the United States, drawing on a wide reading of world literature.
  • ELAGSE9-10RL3 Analyze how complex characters (e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.

Learning Targets:

  • I can analyze the particular point of view of Things Fall Apart, a piece of literature from the Ibo culture of Africa.
  • I can analyze the development of the character Okonkwo and consider how his character helps develop the overall theme of Things Fall Apart.

Opening (do as soon as independent reading ends): 10 minutes

  • THUGNOTES!! Watch the Thugnotes video your teacher will play on the Smartboard. Then, write a Tweet in the Thugnotes style about Things Fall Apart.

Work Session Part 1: Reading (20 minutes)

  • Find Chapters 16-18 of Things Fall Apart. 
  • Find your next Literary Circle Job for this round.
  • Once everyone has their chosen job, read today’s chapters with your group.
  • When you are done reading, move on to part 2.

Work Session Part 2: Working (10 minutes)

  • Do your Literary Circle Job on your own. You can use classroom resources (such as a dictionary) to help you, but you do not need to talk with your classmates.
  • If you finish before the rest of your group, help your other group members with their jobs. When everyone is done, move on to part 3.

Work Session Part 3: Sharing (10 minutes)

  • Go around your group and share what you wrote down. Discuss what you think it means and why it is important.
  • Find the small box on the page for each of your group members’ roles. Take notes over what your group member is saying in the small box.
  • Make sure you understand what your group members are saying, because I might call on you to share!

Closing Session: 10 minutes

Theme Time – Choose and circle one of the following two themes. Then, write a paragraph explaining how Okonkwo shows that theme.

Theme 1: Tradition will always fight against progress.

 

Theme 2: In order to be masculine/manly, you must also be violent.
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