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American Lit: Money and the American Dream

Standard: ELAGSE11-12RI2 Determine two or more central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to provide a complex analysis; provide an objective summary of the text.

Learning Target: I can examine how a single topic is explored by multiple writers and synthesize the ideas of multiple texts.

Opening Session:  euphemism is a different way of saying something that might be considered unpleasant or embarrassing, kind of like a slang term. List as many euphemisms for “money” as you can think of, and then we’re going to go around the room and see how many different ones we can collectively remember.

Work Session: Flip in your textbook to page 81, “Money and the American Dream.” The subject of our debate today is how money plays into the American Dream. Read through the statements on page 81 and write a short explanation for three of them.

After we discuss the quotes, let’s look at this poem, “Money,” by Dana Gioia. What do you think of this poem? It’s almost entirely made of idioms, or figures of speech, about money. There are quite a few, as you can see!

Next up, we will read this scene from A Raisin In The Sun. I’ll take a volunteer to be Mama, one for Ruth, and one for Walter. What are these characters’ attitudes towards money?

Finally, we’re going to put all our readings together (synthesize) and do the Second Read questions on page 85 in your text. This will be a graded assignment!

Closing Session: VOCAB QUIZ!!!!!

Assessment: Formative – class discussions, Formal – vocab quiz

Differentiation: Process – scaffolding

 

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World Lit: Finish your essay!

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a narrative about my childhood that begins to show my cultural identity through a story.

Opening Session: VOCAB QUIZ!!! We will do the vocab quiz before Independent Reading. When you finish the quiz, go straight into reading, and when the reading timer is up, we will trade with a friend and grade them.

Work Session: Today is your last day to work on your Cultural Identity essay. Remember that you should be revealing your cultural identity to me through a story. This is a narrative essay. Narrative means story! TELL ME A STORY!!

You should probably ask a friend or two to read through your essay for a final workshop before you turn it in. It’s also a really good idea to read your essay out loud to yourself. This will help you catch any silly errors like a missed capital letter or typo.

Closing Session: One final review of how to use OneNote and then upload your assignments!! I will be grading them directly from the class Notebook and giving you feedback there.

Assessment: Summative (cultural identity embedded assessment); formative (vocab quiz)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), product (varied essay length or prompt)

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World Lit: Brief pause for USATestPrep….

Standard: ELAGSE9-10W3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

  1. Engage and orient the reader by setting out a problem, situation, or observation, establishing one or multiple point(s) of view, and introducing a narrator and/or characters; create a smooth progression of experiences or events.
  2. Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, description, reflection, and multiple plot lines, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.
  3. Use a variety of techniques to sequence events so that they build on one another to create a coherent whole.
  4. Use precise words and phrases, telling details, and sensory language to convey a vivid picture of the experiences, events, setting, and/or characters.
  5. Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on what is experienced, observed, or resolved over the course of the narrative.

Learning Target: I can compose a narrative about my childhood that begins to show my cultural identity through a story.

Opening Session: Grab a laptop! We are going to do a diagnostic USATestPrep assessment today.

  1. Log in to USATestPrep. If you’ve never used it before, you’ll need to create an account.
  2. Click “Join a Class” and find my name. Make sure you join the right semester/block class 🙂
  3. Take the assessment I’ve assigned to you!

Work Session: After you finish USATestPrep, you can go back to working on your cultural identity paper until everyone is done. Continue your revising, editing, deleting, adding, fixing, and so on and so on.

When everyone is done, I want a few more volunteers to share what they’ve been working on with the class. You don’t have to be completely finished, because you do have one more day to work on this, but if anyone wants to share where they are right now you know we’d love to hear it!

Closing Session: VOCAB REVIEW! Don’t forget quiz tomorrow!!

Assessment: Summative (cultural identity embedded assessment); formative (journal checks, discussion)

Differentiation: Process (scaffolding), product (varied essay length or prompt)

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American Lit:USATestPrep

Standard: 

ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Learning Target: I can demonstrate my mastery of the standards on a USA Test Prep practice assessment.

Opening Session: Grab a computer and log in – we’re going to do some USA Test Prep today! For our opening, I’ll be going around making sure everyone can log in to the website OK 🙂

Work Session: You’ve got the entire work session today to take this USATestPrep assessment. This is sort of our diagnostic assessment for the semester that will tell me y’all’s strengths and weaknesses. Please actually try hard on this, because if I know where everyone needs actual help, then I can help you master those standards – and that’s what everyone wants to do, right?

After you finish the USATestPrep assessment, review vocab for tomorrow, catch up on Independent Reading, or work on anything you might have missed this week.

Closing Session: While I have the laptops in here, I want to briefly introduce you guys to OneNote, which is how we will be turning in all of our assignments. Go to onenote.com and log in, and I’ll give you some time to play around 🙂

Assessment: Formative (USATestPrep)

Differentiation: Formative assessment used as a diagnostic for future differentiation

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American Lit: Declaration of Independence, Day 2

Standard: ELAGSE11-12W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence.

Learning Target: I can evaluate the effectiveness of an argument.

Opening Session: John Adams – the Declaration of Independence

Work Session: Today we will start out with a recap of what we did yesterday, reviewing what was said in the Declaration of Independence. Then, we’re going to jump back into our Springboard texts and do the “Working from the Text” chart together on page 73.

Once the chart is complete, I want you to take the Declaration of Independence as an inspiration and write your OWN declaration. You can declare yourself independent of whatever you want – your country, your school, your family, whatever. But make sure you follow the format of the Declaration of Independence. Start with an introduction, do a list of grievances, then a conclusion. We can share them when you’re done!

Closing Session: Vocab review! With pictures this time!!

Assessment: Formal – declarations will be graded

Differentiation: Process – scaffolded writing prompt; Product – varied lengths.

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