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World Literature: Springboard 5.9

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze an interview to evaluate the impact of subjectivity on a text and identify fallacies in order to evaluate a text’s credibility.

Opening Session
Read the article “DiCaprio Sheds Light on 11th Hour” in Springboard, page 413, and then answer the Second Read questions that follow it if you finish early.

Work Session
While I cue up the DVD, look at the fallacies on page 415 in Springboard. Read over them and highlight the important information that will help you remember them. I’m going to show you a clip from the movie we just read about, The 11th Hour, which is a documentary about climate change made by Leonardo DiCaprio. While I show you chapter 5 of the movie, take notes using the SMELL organizer on page 416 of the Springboard book.

Next, we’re going to do the chart on page 417 together. We’ll look for each fallacy in the clip, then consider if it is fair or not.

Closing Session
Flip to page 418 and look at the Check Your Understanding question. Write a short response and then we will share out!

Assessment
Formative (book check)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning style) Interest

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World Lit: Springboard 5.13

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI3 Analyze how the author unfolds an analysis or series of ideas or events, including the order in which the points are made, how they are introduced and developed, and the connections that are drawn between them. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will evaluate the use of evidence in support of a potential solution to a conflict.

Opening Session
Let’s talk about what we know about bias! What does it mean if someone is biased? Can a source be both biased and credible?

Work Session
Flip in your Springboards to page 443. I’m going to number the class while you guys find the right page. Odd numbers are going to be reading the article titled “The HSUS and Wild Fish Conservancy File Suit top Stop Sea Lion Killing at Bonneville Dam” and then do the second read questions. Even numbers will read “Sea Lions vs. Salmon: Restore Balance and Common Sense” and answer those second read questions.

After we have read and answered the questions, let’s talk about bias again. Do you think either article was biased, and if so how?

Closing Session
Each article we read was a proposal about how to solve an environmental issue. For your essay we will start tomorrow, YOU will be writing a proposal for how to help the social issue you wrote about in your last essay. Consider the bias (or non-bias) of the sources we have read today and how that affected the persuasiveness of the proposal.

Then, start brainstorming for your essay tomorrow.

Assessment
Formative (book check)

Differentiation
Process (scaffolding, learning style) Interest

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World Lit: Springboard 5.20: Presenting an Argument

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10RI8 Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL1.b Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL2 Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL3 Evaluate and/or reflect on a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze the elements of arguments and appeals in film.

Opening Session
Grab your Springboard and look at page 476. Let’s go over what each of the terms in the left hand column mean: Hook, Claim, Support, Concessions/Refutations, and Call to Action. Hint: Your Capstone Presentation should include ALL of those!

Work Session
To start out today, we’re going to watch a video called “The Story of Bottled Water” and then do the chart on page 476 together for the video. DON’T WRITE IN THE BOOK for this one because you’re going to do one on your own in a few minutes!

https://storyofstuff.org/movies/story-of-bottled-water/

After we do the chart together on the board, I’m going to show you another video called “The Story of Stuff” from the same website, and this time I want you to fill in the chart on your own.

https://storyofstuff.org/movies/story-of-stuff/

Finally, I want you to grab a sheet of your own paper and make a chart brainstorming for your own presentation. What will your hook be? Your claim? Your presentation should have all these things in it!

Closing Session
Trade papers with a friend and review each other’s brainstorming. Help your partner have a successful presentation!

Assessment
Formative (book check, brainstorming)

Differentiation
Scaffolding, learning style, high interest videos

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World Lit: Presentation Skills

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10SL1.b Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL2 Integrate multiple sources of information presented in diverse media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively, orally) evaluating the credibility and accuracy of each source. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE9-10SL3 Evaluate and/or reflect on a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will study presentation skills in preparation for their Sophomore Capstone Presentation.

Opening Session
Let’s start out with a TED Talk: How To Speak So People Want To Listen!

Work Session
Share out: What did you learn from that TED Talk? How can we speak so other people want to listen to us?

Get out the green capstone packet I gave you ages and ages ago. I want to go over the requirements for your capstone presentation requirements and rubric. This is what you’re going to be creating starting on Friday. For the rest of this week, we’re going to be discussing presentation skills so you can actually give a coherent presentation.

Here it is in convenient bullet form:

  • You must give a 5-7 minute presentation on a solution to the social issue you have researched this semester.
  • You must have a PowerPoint, Google Slides, Prezi, or tri-fold board as your presentation visual.
  • You must have handouts for the panel of Seniors who will judge your presentation.
  • You will present between Friday, December 14th and Wednesday, December 19th.
  • You will complete a Capstone Reflection during the Final Exam time period on December 20th or 21st.

Let’s look at another TED Talk, about how to be a good public speaker, and then I want to talk about some do’s and don’t’s of presenting.

Closing Session
Let’s close out the day with a third and final TED Talk, this one on body language:

Assessment
Formative (class discussion)

Differentiation
Learning style, scaffolding, interest

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World Lit: Presenting a Solution Essay, Day 3

Standards

  • ELAGSE9-10W1 Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W1.a Introduce precise claim(s), distinguish the claim(s) from alternate or opposing claims, and create an organization that establishes clear relationships among claim(s), counterclaims, reasons, and evidence. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W1.b Develop claim(s) and counterclaims fairly, supplying evidence for each while pointing out the strengths and limitations of both in a manner that anticipates the audience’s knowledge level and concerns. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W1.c Use words, phrases, and clauses to link the major sections of the text, create cohesion, and clarify the relationships between claim(s) and reasons, between reasons and evidence, and between claim(s) and counterclaims. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W1.d Establish and maintain an appropriate style and objective tone. Georgia ELA
    • ELAGSE9-10W1.e Provide a concluding statement or section that follows from and supports the argument presented. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will compose an argumentative essay in which they advocate for a solution to the social issue they have been researching.

Opening Session
Trade essays with a friend and read over what they have so far. Give your friend some feedback on how they can strengthen their argument.

Work Session
Today you will be composing your social issue solution essay.

  • 500-750 words (yes, that is a maximum! You can’t be too long or your presentations will run over time)
  • Formal style
  • Must present a solution to the same social issue you researched earlier this semester. I understand you probably cannot propose a solution to fix, for example, all racism in the whole wide world ever forever, but you can propose something that will help the issue in your own community. That is what you should focus on.
  • MLA format: Times New Roman size 12, double spaced, MLA heading, etc.
  • Your essay will be due Friday, turned in to our class Google Drive.

Closing Session
TURN IT IN!!!

Assessment
Summative (essay)

Differentiation
Process (varied length, scaffolding, interest)

© Mrs. Bristow's and Mr. Mellman's Literature Classes
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