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AP Lang: Hysteria!

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL2 Determine two or more themes or central ideas of text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RL3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze the theme of hysteria in The Crucible and write an essay to demonstrate their perspective.

Opening Session
Let’s discuss the ending of the play, and I want to take a couple volunteers to re-read the ending scene between Elizabeth and John. What is revealed in this scene, why is it important, and how does it connect back to the theme of hysteria we discussed early on in the play?

Work Session
Today is all about hysteria! One of the themes in The Crucible is this idea that hysteria can make good people do terrible things. We’re going to have a class discussion over that idea, and then I would like for you all to write an impromptu essay.

In an essay of about two pages in length, determine if you think the people in Salem were affected by hysteria – what is hysteria, and how did it make people act out of the ordinary? – or if you think the people of Salem were acting rationally. Use evidence from the play to back up your statements, and make a strong, convincing argument.

Closing Session
AP Grading! Trade papers with a friend and grade the essay based on the AP Rubric. Then, explain to your buddy why you gave them the grade you did, and justify your grade with examples from their essay.

Assessment
Formative (AP style essay)

Differentiation
Product (varied essay length)

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World Lit: Two Kinds, Day 2

Standards
ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
I can analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme.

Opening Session
Amy Tan reads her storybook Sagwa, the Chinese Siamese Cat to Elmo and Zoe on Sesame Street!

Work Session
Ok, we’re picking right back up where we left off yesterday with chunks 5 -7 (pg. 26) of “Two Kinds”! When we finish the story, and of course discuss, we will also finish up the Second Read questions on page 30. We will also do the chart on 32.

Closing Session
If you look down at the bottom of page 32, you’ll notice an essay assignment. Take the last fifteen minutes of class today to respond to the essay prompt in 2-3 strong paragraphs.

Assessment
Formative (impromptu short essay)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding)

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AP Lang: Pivotal Scene II

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RL1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RL3 Analyze the impact of the author’s choices regarding how to develop and relate elements of a story or drama (e.g., where a story is set, how the action is ordered, how the characters are introduced and developed). Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze a pivotal scene in The Crucible and interpret the author’s intent.

Opening Session
I’m going to hand back the articles we read on Friday so you guys can see that T chart we made. Let’s share out some of the more interesting differences between the play and history as a review!

Work Session
We’re going to continue in our analysis of The Crucible today by looking at another pivotal scene. This one is the scene between Proctor and Elizabeth at the beginning of Act II.

Last time I had you choose and defend one interpretation of the scene; this time, I want you to choose two:

  • Proctor is cold and distant
  • Elizabeth is cold and distant
  • Proctor and Elizabeth are in love
  • Proctor and Elizabeth hate each other

Choose two interpretations, choose lines that support them, and fill in the chart for how you’d direct the actors to run the scene if you were the producer.

Do two charts this time around!

Closing Session
Let’s have a dramatic reading! I’ll take two volunteers to choose a way to read the scene and perform for the class!

Assessment
Formative (charts, class discussion)

Differentiation
Process (learning style, scaffolding)

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World Lit: Two Kinds, Day 1

Standards
ELAGSE9-10RL2 Determine a theme or central idea of text and closely analyze its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details; provide an objective summary of the text. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze how two characters interact and develop over the course of a text to explain how conflict is used to advance the theme. (bonus points: find some
phrases in that learning target, whew!)

Opening Session
Amy Tan, the author of the story we’re going to read today, on writing from your own personal experience, in an interview:

Work Session
Today we’re going to be reading a story called “Two Kinds,” an excerpt from The Joy Luck Club, a novel by Amy Tan. As you’ve guessed from the video, Tan is a Chinese-American woman, and her story is largely inspired by her own life.

Our goal today is to get through the first 4 chunks of the story, and then do the Second Read questions 1-4 on page 30. We’re going to go over these and of course frequently stop while we’re reading to talk, so I hope by the end of the day you have a solid handle on the story!

Closing Session
Prediction: Write a short prediction on a scrap paper about what you think is going to happen. Keep the paper.

Assessment
Informal – check of Second Read questions

Differentiation
Process (varied length reading passages)

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AP Lang: What Really Happened

Standards

  • ELAGSE11-12RI6 Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text in which the rhetoric is particularly effective, analyzing how style and content contribute to the power, persuasiveness, or beauty of the text. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI7 Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented indifferent media or formats (e.g., visually, quantitatively) as well as in words in order to address a question or solve a problem. Georgia ELA
  • ELAGSE11-12RI1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. Georgia ELA

Learning Target
Students will analyze an article about the veracity of The Crucible and analyze how authors might sensationalize stories to get a specific reaction from the audience.

Opening Session
THUGNOTES!

Work Session
Today we’re reading an article titled “The Crucible: Fact or Fiction?” that really goes into some awesome detail about exactly what happened in history versus in the play.

Read and SOAPSTone the article, then make a T-chart in which you list the events of history on one side and the alternate events of the play on the other. Then, I want you to consider why Miller might have made some of the specific choices that he did to rewrite history.

Write a paragraph in which you specifically name one or two of the ways Miller changed history, then analyze WHY he made that decision. What affect did that change have on the play? On the audience? Or did he change the play for a completely different reason, such as racism or another prejudice?

Closing Session
With whatever time we have left, grab your books and read Act III. You will need to have the entire act read when you get back here on Monday 🙂

Assessment Strategies
Formative (T-charts and paragraph checks)

Differentiation
Process (Scaffolding, annotated text as needed)

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